Camrose AB Funeral Homes

Camrose AB funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Camrose funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Burgar Funeral Home - Camrose

4817 - 51 Avenue
Camrose, AB T4V 0V4
(780) 672-2121

Weber's Mount Pleasant Chapel

2 Mount Pleasant Drive
Camrose, AB T4V 2L7
(780) 672-3131

Camrose AB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Hitchhiker killed in county - Sherwood Park News

Friday, January 6, 2017

A hitchhiker killed early last Wednesday in Strathcona County was heading home to Camrose to patch things up after a family fight, his sister says. Passersby found Phoenix Taypayosatum, 28, shortly before 4 a.m. at the intersection of Highway 21 and Township Road 520, just south of Sherwood Park, after being struck by an unknown northbound vehicle. His younger sister, Autumn Taypayosatum, said in an interview last Friday that her brother, his girlfriend and their 11-month-old daughter had been staying with her in Camrose until Dec. 14. Her brother hitchhiked to Edmonton after a family fight and was returning to his sister’s home when the collision happened, she said. “He was understanding, very loving and we always kept in contact when he was gone,” she said. “That whole time he was gone in Edmonton, he kept in contact with me.” She said her brother was always hitchhiking; in fact, when she was 18, the pair hitchhiked from their home in Winnipeg to Regina and then to Edmonton. Soon after arriving in Edmonton, she moved to Camrose. “He was a free spirit,” she said.
http://www.sherwoodparknews.com/2017/01/06/hitchhiker-killed-in-county

Hitchhiker killed on way home in Alberta - Canoe

Friday, January 6, 2017

Juris Graney, Postmedia Network Dec 30, 2016, Last Updated: 11:54 PM ET A hitchhiker killed early Wednesday near Sherwood Park was heading home to Camrose to patch things up after a family fight, his sister says. Passersby found Phoenix Taypayosatum, 28, shortly before 4 a.m. at the intersection of Highway 21 and Township Road 520 after being struck by an unknown northbound vehicle. His younger sister, Autumn Taypayosatum, said in an interview Friday that her brother, his girlfriend and their 11-month-old daughter had been staying with her in Camrose until Dec. 14. Her brother hitchhiked to Edmonton after a family fight and was returning to his sister's home when the accident happened, she said. "He was understanding, very loving and we always kept in contact when he was gone," she said. "That whole time he was gone in Edmonton he kept in contact with me." She said her brother was always hitchhiking; in fact, when she was 18, the pair hitchhiked from their home in Winnipeg to Regina and then to Edmonton. Soon after arriving in Edmonton, she moved to Camrose. "He was a free spirit," she said. "He was a traveller. He hitchhiked all...
http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/Canada/2016/12/30/22693774.html

Scholarship recipients flock to Opus 37 - St. Albert Gazette

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

When McCormack was 12, economic reasons forced the family to move to Alberta. She grew up in Wainwright and completed undergraduate music studies in vocal performance at Camrose’s Augustana College. McCormack moved up to Edmonton in 2010 and for four years was a vital part of St. Albert Parish’s youth and music ministry. Her involvement was extensive, selecting music for all occasions including masses, funerals and weddings, coordinating schedules, leading children’s choirs and the youth ministry. In 2014 McCormack applied to the Centre for Opera Studies (COSI) in Sulmona, Italy to join a month-long comprehensive summer training program that immerses emerging opera artists into the complete world of opera. She studied under vocal trainer Timothy Noble, among others. But it was his influence that prompted McCormack to steer her vocal education outside Canada. Noble, a former baritone with mentoring ties to the Canadian Opera Company, is a distinguished professor at Indiana University. “We hit it off in Italy. I connected with him and I wanted to work with him. I took lessons every day from him and learned the technical knowledge I needed. He was very encouraging without trying to control me. He was very helpful in helping me plan the next steps,” McCormack said. The reality of paying a $26,000 annual tuition caused some anxiety. Indiana offered the emerging Alberta singer a substantial scholarship. But McCormack still needed an additional $5,000 plus living expenses. An application to the Anne Burrows Music Foundation, netted McCormack a $10,000 scholarship for the first year and $5,000 to complete the second. As a way of showing her gratitude, the aspiring mezzo is delighted to perform for an appreciative home crowd. “It’s wonderful to be part of a community of people who are kind, supportive and generous.” Emerging classical guitarist Travis Luckert, a 2015 St. Albert Rotary Music Festival scholarship winner and two-time performer at St. Albert Chamber Music Society series, is also on the program. Michael Massey, conductor of the Edmonton Youth Orchestra and Order of Canada recipient, is guest pianist and will accompany four performers. A complete list of performers is available at burrowsfoundation.org. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.stalbertgazette.com/article/Scholarship-recipients-flock-to-Opus-37-20161224

Ian Kucerak's top photos and video of 2016 - Edmonton Journal

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Edmonton Folk Music Festival at Gallagher Park on August 4, 2016. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Bullfighters at work during Bulls For Breakfast at Big Valley Jamboree 2016 in Camrose on July 29, 2016. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Elias Malkum speaks about the loss of his brother Leonardo Duran Ibanez on Nov. 16, 2016. A GoFundMe page was set up to help Malkum send his brother’s body home to Columbia for a funeral. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Tim Hickson, of the University of Alberta Golden Bears, is tripped up by UBC Thunderbirds’ Manpal Brar during the Canada West Final Four gold medal game at Foote Field on Nov. 6, 2016. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Medicine Hat’s Alex Alders scores a run as Edmonton’s Zach Siggelkow misses a tag during a playoff game between the Edmonton Prospects and the Medicine Hat Mavericks in Edmonton on Sunday, August 7, 2016. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia David Smith competes in the men’s 200M medley during the 2016 International Gay and Lesbian Aquatics Championships in Edmonton on August 10, 2016. Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Edwin of I Mother Earth performs at the Shaw Conference Centre on October 20, 2016. The band was touring with Our Lady Peace. Postmedia Master Japanese swordsmith Taro Asano works at Edmonton blacksmith Shawn Cunningham’s shop on October 14, 2016. Asano, who is called Fusataro, is sharing his knowledge of traditional Japanese...
http://edmontonjournal.com/year-in-review/year-in-review-ian-kuceraks-top-photos-and-video-of-2016

The builder of peace - St. Albert Gazette

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Blackfoot called him Aahsosskitsipahpiwa, or “the good heart.” Lacombe would use that reputation to stop many conflicts. In 1865, for example, while lodged with the Blackfoot near Camrose and the Battle River, Lacombe awoke to find his hosts in the midst of a pitched battle with Cree forces, MacGregor notes. Bullets whizzing all around, Lacombe mounted a ridge, cross and flag in hand, and called out to the Cree in their language, identifying himself in an attempt to convince them to cease-fire. A ricochet caught him in the shoulder and grazed his head, knocking him flat in the snow. The Blackfoot rallied, and one of their warriors shouted at the Cree, “Stop you dogs. Have you not done enough? You have shot your blackrobe!” The Cree, realizing what they had done, immediately broke off their attack, no doubt s...
http://www.stalbertgazette.com/article/The-builder-of-peace-20161130

Conservation group says Alberta grizzly, Bear 148, shot dead in BC - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

PM EDT EDMONTON -- Conservationists are mourning the death of a female grizzly bear that had been moved from a popular area west of Calgary this summer to a remote park in northwest Alberta. Stephen Legault of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative said Bear 148 was shot by a hunter on Sunday after wandering into British Columbia from its new home. Legault said the bear was just becoming old enough to have cubs. "What is really sad is that we have lost the potential that this grizzly bear represented for the further recovery of the threatened species in Alberta," he said Wednesday. He noted that grizzly bears are often killed after being struck on highways and by trains. "The fact that this bear was killed by a hunter illustrates the fact that there are many threats to these animals." The B.C. government plans to ban the killing of grizzly bears for trophy, but not until after this hunting season. Parks Canada and the Alberta government later confirmed the death of Bear 148. "This outcome underlines the need for more collaboration across jurisdictions to co-ordinate wildlife and people management at a landscape level," Parks Canada said in an email. Bear 148 was moved in July from its range near Banff and Canmore, Alta., to Kakwa Wildland Park. The bear never hurt anyone but had gotten too close to people dozens of times since it was born in the Banff National Park a...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

I said to the seniors, ‘If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Calgary murder victim Nadia El-Dib laid to rest on Easter Sunday - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

RCMP officer was injured after a shootout west of Edmonton near Evansburg, Alta. on Thursday night.WATCH: Mason Davis captured this audio from a police scanner during the tense moments when an Alberta RCMP officer was shot and a murder suspect killed west of Edmonton near Evansburg.It started when RCMP said an officer spotted a man who was believed to be wanted on a Canada-wide warrant, and a chase began after he failed to stop his vehicle.In the confrontation that followed, police say the suspect was killed and the RCMP officer suffered minor injuries. Sgt. Brian Topham, 59, was airlifted to hospital in Edmonton after a bullet grazed his head. He was released on Sunday.READ MORE: Evansburg RCMP officer recovering after shootout with murder suspect west of EdmontonLet's block ads! (Why?)...