Kensington PE Funeral Homes

Kensington PE funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Kensington funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Express your deepest sympathy - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Wonderful way to honor the life and memory of a cherished friend or loved one.

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

All white shimmering blossoms symbolize peace, love, and tranquility.

Davison Funeral Home & Chapel

7 Sunset Dr.
Kensington, PE C0B 1M0
(902) 836-3313

Kensington PE Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Raymond Lemieux - Newbritainherald

Friday, March 17, 2017

Rejeanne (Dupuis) Lemieux with whom he shared 50 years of marriage.Raymond was born in Quebec, Canada, and moved his family to New Britain, Conn., in 1961. He was a member of St. Paul’s Church in Kensington and a retiree of Emhart Corp. in Berlin.After retirement he took great pride in his gardening especially his prize-winning pumpkins. He enjoyed golfing with his wife and got a hole in one at Timberland Golf Course. He was an avid fan of the Montreal Canadiens.He was a loving father and grandfather to his six children. Surviving are his two sons, Pierre and wife, Denise, Alain and Karen; daughters, Francine Andros and husband, Francis; Elaine Brousseau and husband, George; Diane Cannata and husband, Michael; Jackie Craco and husband, Rob, 12 grandchildren and 11 great- grandchildren.A Mass of Christian burial will be held Friday, March 17, 2017, at 11:30 at St. Paul’s Church, 485 Alling St., Kensington. Calling hours will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. prior to the Mass at the Berlin Memorial Funeral Home, 96 Main St., Kensington. Burial will be held at the convenience of the family. To offer an online condolence, please visit www.BerlinMemorialfuneralhome.comDonations in lieu of flowers can be made to the Franciscan Hospice Care at 267 Finch Ave., Meriden, CT 06451.www.francisca...
http://www.centralctcommunications.com/newbritainherald/article_a58fa65a-09e6-11e7-9f96-a74c601c499d.html

'Great Canadian' Rose Wolfe was a leader in the Jewish and wider communities - Canadian Jewish News (blog)

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

She was born Rose Senderowitz on Aug. 7, 1916, to Clara and Morris Senderowitz, Romanian immigrants who ran a small bakery in Toronto’s Kensington Market. Despite the Depression of the 1930s, her parents put Rose and her three sisters through university. “We never knew how they did it,” she told a U of T publication on the occasion of her 100th birthday. “They had a little bakery and they sold bread for five cents a loaf. Maybe they made half a cent profit on each loaf, so you think of the number of loaves of bread you have to sell to eke out a living. They were both very industrious people. My mother sewed all our clothes. She worked in the bakery, took care of the whole house and took in two of my orphaned cousins. “I remember that right in the middle of the Depression, she decided we should move, and we ended up in Forest Hill, when Forest Hill had cows in it. We never knew why she decided to move there when most Jewish families moved to Grace Street or Palmerston. It was a mystery.” Believing her math skills weren’t good enough to become a doctor, she studied sociology, graduating in 1938, then took a one-year diploma in social work. She married Ray W...
http://www.cjnews.com/news/canada/great-canadian-rose-wolfe-leader-jewish-wider-communities

'King of Kensington' now in hospice - Burnaby Now

Friday, January 6, 2017

A longtime Burnaby volunteer who was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer in the fall has moved to hospice. It’s unknown how much time Ken Ryan, also known as the ‘King of Kensington’ around town, has left, but he’s in good spirits, according to family friend Shirley Hatch. “He’s still trying to make the best of the days he has. He’ll have a lot of good days, but he’ll have some bad days, too,” she told the NOW. “His wit is all there. He’ll come with the comebacks real quick.” Ryan, 75, has dedicated the majority of his life to giving back to his community. Among his laundry list of accomplishments, he founded the Kensington Community Fair in 1993. He also sat on numerous committees, including the Burnaby North Community Association, anti-graffiti, Comshare, Hats Off Day, the Optimist Club, Coats for Kids, Block Watch and many more. For two decades, Ryan put on the big, red suit and was Santa for the kids at the Lochdale Community School. He also helped fund the school’s seniors’ tea and pancake breakfast. During the summer, he’d run Comshare, a children’s summer camp that featured sports, cooking, crafts and day trips. Ryan was also the one who organize...
http://www.burnabynow.com/community/king-of-kensington-now-in-hospice-1.5684618

'Great Canadian' Rose Wolfe was leader in the Jewish, wider communities - Canadian Jewish News (blog)

Friday, January 6, 2017

She was born Rose Senderowitz on Aug. 7, 1916, to Clara and Morris Senderowitz, Romanian immigrants who ran a small bakery in Toronto’s Kensington Market. Despite the Depression of the 1930s, her parents put Rose and her three sisters through university. “We never knew how they did it,” she told a U of T publication on the occasion of her 100th birthday. “They had a little bakery and they sold bread for five cents a loaf. Maybe they made half a cent profit on each loaf, so you think of the number of loaves of bread you have to sell to eke out a living. They were both very industrious people. My mother sewed all our clothes. She worked in the bakery, took care of the whole house and took in two of my orphaned cousins. “I remember that right in the middle of the Depression, she decided we should move, and we ended up in Forest Hill, when Forest Hill had cows in it. We never knew why she decided to move there when most Jewish families moved to Grace Street or Palmerston. It was a mystery.” Believing her math skills weren’t good enough to become a doctor, she studied sociology, graduating in 1938, then took a one-year diploma in social work. She married Ray Wolfe in 1940. She worked for a time with family services in Vancouver while her husband served with the Royal Canadian Air Force, after which the couple returned to Toronto where Wolfe worked at the Protestant Children’s Homes. Around 1947, she went to work at JF&CS, helping to find homes for Jewish children who had survived the Holocaust and were living in displaced persons camps in Poland, Belgium and France. “The war was over,” Wolfe told the Star. “But we really didn’t know the numbers or the hor...
http://www.cjnews.com/news/canada/great-canadian-rose-wolfe-leader-jewish-wider-communities

Dorothy (Matczak) Motulko - Newbritainherald

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Dorothy (Matczak) Motulko, 91, of Kensington, widow of John Motulko, died peacefully Tuesday morning at home. Born in Dixon City, Pa., daughter of the late Joseph and the late Eva (Comminska) Matczak, she graduated from New Britain General Hospital School of Nursing, and was employed at Surgical Associates in New Britain. She was a member of St. Paul’s Church, an avid UConn Husky and NFL football fan, and her dedication to cooking and baking for others will be dearly missed. She is survived by a daughter, Nancy Motulko of Kensington; a granddaughter, Danielle Krupski; two grandsons, Michael John Espinosa and Steven Andrew Espinosa; a great-grandson, Matthew Lawrence Espinosa; a son-in-law, Marian Lagosz, several nieces and nephews including Ann Marie Matczak, and many very close friends. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by two daughters, Laura Lagosz and Diane Motulko; a grandson, Neil Krupski; four brothers, Walter, Stanley, Joseph, and Peter Matzcak, and three sisters, Agnes Rental, Martha Pollack, and...
http://www.centralctcommunications.com/newbritainherald/article_510d6bcc-cc91-11e6-b91c-d7724eb53e9e.html

Funeral homes warned to be prepared in advance of possible pandemic - Toronto Star

Thursday, September 14, 2017

The agency notes the average attendance at a visitation in Prince Edward Island is 1,000 to 1,400 people.No special vehicle or driver’s licence is needed for transportation of the deceased, the agency states.“Therefore, there are no restrictions on families transporting bodies of family members if they have a death certificate.”Let's block ads! (Why?)...

Fall at construction site claims life of worker, 33 - OHS Canada

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Canadian OH&S News) — A 33-year-old construction worker from Prince Edward Island has died after he fell off a roof in Calgary on July 24.A spokesperson with the Calgary Police Service (CPS) said that police had been called to a construction site on Mahogany Mews SE at about 3:20 p.m. that day, following reports of a male worker falling off a roof of a four-storey building.“He was confirmed deceased at the scene by EMS,” the spokesperson added. After the CPS determined that the death had been accidental, “we notified a medical examiner and Occupational Health and Safety in Alberta, and they’re now handling the investigation.”Shirley Lyn, public-affairs officer for the Alberta Ministry of Labour, confirmed that the Ministry’s oh&s department was investigating the incident, but could not provide further details.It was unclear at press time whether the victim was using fall-protection equipment at the time of the accident. “That’s part of the investigation,” said Lyn.The victim was later publicly identified as Tyler Wallace MacDonald, who was o...
http://www.ohscanada.com/fall-construction-site-claims-life-worker-33/

The real 'Father of Confederation' – Part 2 - Cumberland News Now - Cumberland News Now

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Association of Canada and served as it’s first President.He constantly promoted the expansion of Canada as Minister of the Crown in the MacDonald administration. He assisted greatly in bringing Prince Edward Island into Confederation. He played a major role in the purchase of vast lands of the Hudson’s Bay Company, which made expansion westward possible leading eventually to the creation of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.No one believed more in the necessity to build a railroad to the Pacific Coast than Charles Tupper. He worked tirelessly on that front. In 1881, he personally visited the colony of British Columbia. At that time there was only one house in what eventually became the city of Vancouver. Yet Tupper foresaw and predicted a great metropolis.That same year, while Canadian High Commissioner in London, as well as Minister of Railways and Canals of Canada, the dream of a national railroad was in trouble. The Canadian Pacific Railway Company had encountered unforeseen problems and expenses and faced imminent financial collapse. Tupper rushed back from London and persuaded his party and Parliament to give the company a loan of 30 million dollars for four years at four percent. This is an example of the reason Charles Tupper is referred to as “the man behind the National Policy”. Building that railway and connecting the country from coast to coast was indeed a major accomplishment. Tupper himself, in one of his speeches, observed that 4 million citizens of Canada accomplished what it took 40 million Americans to do - build a railway to the Pacific.Of course we must not forget to mention strong support for the building of a canal across the isthmus of Chignecto. When the prospect of a ship railway appeared and looked feasible, he supported that with all his might. It did not come to pass, and is a long story for another time, but not due to any lack of support from Charles Tupper. Charles Tupper was first knighted in 1868 and was named a Baronet of the United Kingdom in 1888 in recognition of his service to the Empire. After he retired from the Canadian Parliament, he and his wife moved to England where he lived until his death in 1915. He often visited Canada, however, because he had children and grandchildren from coast to coast.In England he continued his public service. He sat on the executive committee of the British Empire League,which also allowed him to promote closer economic ties and the welfare of Canada in general. As an emissary of the British Crown he travelled to various capital cities of Europe. For his service to the Empire he was made a knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael and St. George ...
http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/opinion/columnists/2017/6/30/the-real-_father-of-confederation--part-2.html