Sudbury ON Funeral Homes

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Co-Operative Funeraire

222 Lasalle Blvd
Sudbury, ON P3A 1W5
(705) 566-2100

Jackson & Barnard Funeral Home

233 Larch St,
Sudbury, ON P3B 1M2
(705) 673-9591

Lougheed and Jackson & Barnard Funeral Home

62 Eyre Greater
Sudbury, ON P3C 4A7
(705) 673-7545

Lougheed Funeral Home

252 Regent Street
Sudbury, ON P3C 4C8
(705) 673-9591

Sudbury ON Obituaries and Funeral Related News

The Sudbury man who discovered and named the Ring of Fire has died - ElliotLakeToday.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Sudbury-born Richard Nemis, best known for his company's discovery of the Ring of Fire, died on March 9. It was Nemis, a big fan of Johnny Cash, who gave the massive chromite discovery in the James Bay lowlands its nickname. Born in Sudbury in 1938 to the late James and Chrissie Nemis, he was predeceased by his wife Diane (Coulson) and is survived by his children Jennifer Elizabeth and Richard James, brother Terry and sister Melody, several nieces and a nephew. A graduate of the University of Ottawa and Osgoode Hall, over his 50-career in the exploration sector as a lawyer and promoter, Nemis was successful in raising millions for mineral projects at Eagle River and Windfall Lake. But his legacy project will be the discovery of one of the world's biggest chromite find at McFaulds Lake in the James Bay lowlands as president of Noront Resources. Joining him in that discovery were John Harvey, Donald Hoy, Neil Novak and Mac Watson. In 2009, he was a co-recipient of the Bill D...
https://www.elliotlaketoday.com/local-news/the-sudbury-man-who-discovered-and-named-the-ring-of-fire-has-died-1320417

Ring of Fire discoverer dies - Northern Ontario Business

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Sudbury-born Richard Nemis, best known for his company's discovery of the Ring of Fire, died on March 9. It was Nemis, a big fan of Johnny Cash, who gave the massive chromite discovery in the James Bay lowlands its nickname. Born in Sudbury in 1938 to the late James and Chrissie Nemis, he was predeceased by his wife Diane (Coulson) and is survived by his children Jennifer Elizabeth and Richard James, brother Terry and sister Melody, several nieces and a nephew. A graduate of the University of Ottawa and Osgoode Hall, over his 50-career in the exploration sector as a lawyer and promoter, Nemis was successful in raising millions for mineral projects at Eagle River and Windfall Lake. But his legacy project will be the discovery of one of the world's biggest chromite find at McFaulds Lake in the James Bay lowlands as president of Noront Resources. Joining him in that discovery were John Harvey, Donald Hoy, Neil Novak and Mac Watson. In 2009, he was a co-recipient of the Bill D...
https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/regional-news/far-north-ring-of-fire/ring-of-fire-discoverer-dies-1317487

North Bay family prepares for Jennifer Lynne Semenec's funeral - The North Bay Nugget

Saturday, March 02, 2019

He might have been having flashbacks. … The only two people who know what happened are not here," Ridley said in an interview from her home in Sudbury. "I'm just trying to keep an open mind."Semenec's daughter, 18-year-old Alia Woodward, lived with the couple for almost a year after Poulin started dating her mother in December 2016 and then moved into their North Bay home in early spring.She describes Semenec as a personal care worker for seniors who was also "a neighbourhood mom," eager to be involved with both her friends and those of her 24-year-old brother, Zachary Semenec, who also lived at home.Her shock at Semenec's death stems in part from having witnessed what appeared to be a strong bond between her mother and her new partner."In my mind, maybe he had issues, but the thing she liked about him was how much of a gentleman he was. He opened the door for her all the time and shut it as she got into the truck. He was kind to her," she said in a telephone interview.When her mother had a hysterectomy in February of last year, she said the heavyset veteran had flopped down on the floor each night next to a couch where she was recovering, ready to offer help.Still, both Woodward and Zachary Semenec also have strong recollections of Poulin on the telephone - sometimes multiple times a week - expressing frustrations as he attempted to get help from Veterans Affairs for his illnesses.Both of Semenec's children recall he attended therapy sessions with their mother. At times he became withdrawn, and "put up walls," said Woodward.In August, the veteran tried to take his own life, overdosing on his PTSD medications and spending several days in hospital.A note Poulin wrote afterwards describes his desire to turn around his life and to care for his family members. It is critical of the Veterans Affairs programs, with Poulin saying he'd recover despite alleged shortcomings in PTSD care."(I) am just happy that I am not just going to be another soldier that falls through the cracks of the (expletive) support system they have for vets," says the excerpt.Shelley Foster, Poulin's wife, said in a telephone interview that she is still seeking the details of Poulin's care from Vetera...
https://www.nugget.ca/2018/04/17/north-bay-family-prepares-for-jennifer-lynne-semenecs-funeral/wcm/4a99e3b7-1842-c677-f50d-8594c227ddc9

From 99 dead when train plunged through swing bridge to Lac-M├ęgantic: Canada's most deadly rail accidents - CBC News

Saturday, March 02, 2019

There were many opportunities to avoid a deadly crash that killed 47 people in July, 2013. 0:475. West of Sudbury, Ont. Jan. 21, 1910 43 deadA passenger train left the tracks near the crossing west of Sudbury, at the Spanish River on Jan. 21, 1910. The first two rail cars fell into the freezing river below, killing 43 people. Speed and a broken rail were considered factors.6. Almonte, Ont. Dec. 27, 1942 39 deadDuring the Second World War, a train carrying troops from Alberta crashed into a passenger train sitting in the station in Almonte, Ont., on Dec. 27, 1942, injuring more than 200 people and killing 39. The passenger train was running behind schedule, with railway staff blaming the delay on stormy weather, icy tracks, a downgraded line and the congestion of holiday traffic. The conductor of the troop-laden train later killed himself.[embedded content]7. Dugald, Man. Sept. 1, 1947 31 deadA passenger train headed west failed to turn into a siding and crashed into an eastbound train in Dugald, Man., on Sept. 1, 1947. Wooden passenger cars were kept in service due to steel rationing during the Second World War and the fire was fed by the wood and the old cars' gas illumination. The crash and fire killed 31 people. Newer, safer railway cars were ordered as a result of the crash.8. Wanstead, Ont. Dec. 27. 1902 31 dead​A westbound express train headed to Sarnia, Ont., from London increased its speed near the Wanstead station, colliding with a slow-moving eastbound freight train that had been trying to get out of the way. It left 31 dead. Weather conditions on Dec. 27, 1902, had reduced visibility so the two trains couldn't see each other until it was too late.9. Hinton, Alta. Feb. 8, 1986 23 deadA freight train collided with a passenger train between Jasper and Edmonton, leaving 95 injured and 23 dead on Feb. 8, 1986. An inquiry found the crew ignored stop signals and failed to follow established operating rules, while demonstrating a lack of awareness.In 1986, 23 people died after a CN freight train crashed into a VIA passenger train in Hinton, Alta. Investigators suspect the CN crew fell asleep. (Karen Sornberger/Edmonton Journal/The Canadian Press)10. Canoe River, B.C. Nov. 21, 1950 21 deadOn Nov. 21, 1950, a train carrying troops for the Korean War crashed with a second train after railway telegraph operator Jack Atherton sent an incomplete message regarding the location of one of the trains. The crash led to the death of 17 soldiers and four crew members. Defended by John Diefenbaker (who practised criminal law before becoming Canadian prime minister from 1957 to 1963), Atherton was found not guilty.The silver-tongued lawyer wins his most sensational case. 6:45With files from CBC Archives, the Passionate Eyea href="...
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/canada-deadly-rail-train-crashes-1.5006876

Dave Newell remembered as respected referee, family man first - The Sudbury Star

Saturday, March 02, 2019

Frank Udvari, came to see him at 1 p.m., hours before puck drop. The House of Kin 2006 Sports Hall of Fame inductees included Dan Welch (left), representing the Sudbury Canoe Club, Christine Farnel, representing her late husband Russ Farnel, Dave Newell and John Hatzis. John Lappa/The Sudbury Star/Postmedia Network "I got to be on the ice with David, I got to work with him, I got to see how much respect he had from players and coaches for the type of job that he did, for the way he refereed a hockey game, for the way he understood the way the game was to be refereed," McCourt said.That respect was apparent in a stream of social media posts that marked Newell's passing this week."Dave Newell was a dear friend, a mentor and an outstanding referee," tweeted former referee Paul Stewart. "RIP ‘Newelly.' He will be greatly missed. Dave reffed my first NHL game for Quebec, took me under his wing at my 1st officiating camp and my NHL reffing debut came when I stepped in for him due to injury.""Very sad to hear of the passing of former NHL referee and fellow Sudbury native Dave Newell (He would take umbrage to that last reference, since he was proudly from Copper Cliff.)," Hockey News columnist Ken Campbell added. "Great referee. Even greater human being.""We are deeply saddened 2learn of the passing today of dear friend & former colleague, NHL Referee Dave Newell," tweeted Kerry Fraser, another longtime former referee. "Dave was a courageous, selfless leader as longtime President of the NHLOA. ‘Newts' stood tall 4what was right & fought for the little guy regardless of personal cost."Newell led the officials' association through a time of change, during which members fought for higher pay, the league expanded and a new crop of officials entered the ranks."Dave led us through all of that," McCourt said. "He was at the forefront of it all."Newell famously refused, along with Ray Scapinello and Gord Broseker, to officiate a playoff game involving the New Jersey Devils and Boston Bruins when Jim Schoenfeld was allowed to coach. Devils bench boss Schoenfeld had been suspende...
https://www.thesudburystar.com/sports/local-sports/dave-newell-remembered-as-respected-referee-family-man-first

BRIAN DAVID MUEHLMAN - Burlington County Times

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Brian enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was an avid whitetail deer hunter, traveling throughout United States and Canada hunting with his grandson, Kurt. Brian was a USCG Charter Captain on Lake Ontario for 15 years. His most cherished time was spent with his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Gail Krauss Muehlman; his mother and step father, Margaret (Rex) Smith of Wexford; daughter, Candi (Joe) Landles of Evans City; step daughter, Becky Flagler of Pittsburgh; siblings, Connie Federbusch, Laurie (Ron) Mahen, and Mark (Pam) Muehlman, all of Mercer; nine grandchildren, Kurt, Mariah, Rayna, Seth, Brandon, Riley, Connor, Liam, and Nico; and several nieces and nephews. Brian was preceded in death by his father, Paul Muehlman and his brother in law, Oscar Federbusch. Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, from 2 to 8 p.m. at the MARSHALL FUNERAL HOME, 200 Fountain Ave., Ellwood City. Friends will also be received at the funeral home on Thursday from 10:30 a.m. until the time of the blessing service at 11:30 a.m. Rev. Father Mark Thomas will officiate. Interment will follow in Holy Redeemer Cemetery. Memorial contributions in Brian's memory may be made to the Steven King Foundation, 621 Street, Jetmore, KS 67854 or Victory Junction, 4500 Adams Way, Randalman, NC 27317. Online condolences may be sent to marshallsfh. com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/obituaries/20190319/brian-david-muehlman

Clark Davey, 1928-2019: 'The true journalist of journalists' - Ottawa Citizen

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

He was heartbroken after failing his medical, but an English teacher told him that people would pay him to write. So he enrolled in the first journalism degree course taught at University of Western Ontario, graduating in 1948 and joining the newsroom of the Chatham Daily News.There, he worked under Richard "Dic" Doyle, but moved to Kirkland Lake when the Thomson newspaper chain made him editor-in-chief of the Northern Daily News. His time there was brief, however, as his girlfriend, Joyce Gordon, issued him an ultimatum: Northern Ontario or me. He chose her: they married in September 1952.In the meantime, he joined the newsroom of the Globe and Mail, where his mentor Doyle had been working for a year.As a reporter with the Globe, Davey covered national and international affairs, including the Suez Canal crisis, the St. Lawrence Seaway project and the cancellation of the Avro Arrow program. During the 1957 federal election campaign, he recognized that Tory leader John Diefenbaker was gaining momentum and might actually win, and convinced his editors to allow him to stay with the Chief's campaign for 40 days. Clark Davey, former publisher of the Montreal Gazette, displaying a mock-up of the paper's new Sunday edition in 1988. Bill Grimshaw / The Canadian Press When Doyle became editor of the Globe in 1963, he chose Davey as his managing editor, and, according to Mills, the two raised the broadsheet's reputation from that of a local paper to a national one. Davey was managing editor for 15 years before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1978. He was publisher there until 1983, when he took over at the Gazette. He was publisher of the Citizen from 1989 to 1993. He was also president and chair of The Canadian Press, and co-founder and president of the Michener Awards Foundation that oversees the country's most prestigious journalism prize."He was the true journalist of journalists," says Kim Kierans, journalism professor at University of King's College in Halifax and Michener Foundation board member. "He told me when I last saw him in November, ‘If we're not providing the encouragement for journalism organizations and journalists within them to do the journalism that matters, then we're in trouble as a democracy.'"He was also a lovely man, smart and sparkling … with incredible enthusiasm for the business and its future."According to Mills, Davey, who in 2002 led a protest on the steps of the Ottawa Citizen after Mills was fired for running an editorial critical of then-prime minister Jean Chrétien, was known as tough and gruff, "but deep down he was a really kind and thoughtful person, and a very good friend who was always fair to people. But if you didn't know him, he could be intimidating."And although he called the shots on the job, it was Joyce who ruled the home roost. According to son Ric, his father only stopped the presses twice - once while at the Globe, when Joyce called him to report that she and Ric thought they had just seen a UFO."That was the kind of pull she had over him," says Ric.Clark Davey is survived by his wife, Joyce; brother Kenneth George; children Ric (Rita Celli), Kevin (Margaret) and Clark Jr. (...
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/clark-davey-1928-2019-the-true-journalist-of-journalists

Cecile J. Briggs - WatertownDailyTimes.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. There will be no funeral services and burial will be at a later date in Calvary Cemetery, Massena.Cecile was born on November 14, 1933 in Cornwall, Ontario, the daughter of Claude and Bertha (Belanger) Villeneuve. She married Joseph Maugeri Jr. on February 21, 1958. He predeceased her on April 19, 1972. She later married Ivan Briggs on June 20, 1975. He predeceased her in June 2001.She enjoyed playing bingo, traveling and spending time on social media.She is survived by her son Joseph Maugeri III and his wife Becky of Clayville, NY; three grandchildren, Joseph, Benjamin and Matthew Maugeri; a brother, Cyril and wife Sylvia Villeneuve and two sisters, Claudette Lefebvre and Bernadette Good as well as several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two sisters Bernice Sequin and Marie Claire Payette.Arrangements are under the direction of Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. Memories and online condolences may be share with the family at www.PhillipsMemorial.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.watertowndailytimes.com/obit/cecile-j-briggs-20190316