Erin ON Funeral Homes

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Butcher Family Funeral Home

5399 main St. S
Erin, ON N0B 1T0
(519) 833-2231

Erin ON Obituaries and Funeral Related News

'One team for Humboldt': Supporters don jerseys in global show of support - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Regional Police (@YRP) April 12, 2018 There will be a lot of #jerseysforhumboldt at schools across Canada today to show support for Humboldt and the Broncos families. pic.twitter.com/3X7OQHSYzF — Erin O'Toole (@ErinOTooleMP) April 12, 2018 We wear our jerseys, and green and gold, to show our support and send our love to the families and community of the #HumboldtBroncos. #JerseysForHumboldt#HumboldtStrong#JerseyDay#SenCApic.twitter.com/O9s9N04Feo — Senate of Canada (@SenateCA) A...

Conservation group says Alberta grizzly, Bear 148, shot dead in BC - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Calgary this summer to a remote park in northwest Alberta. Stephen Legault of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative said Bear 148 was shot by a hunter on Sunday after wandering into British Columbia from its new home. Legault said the bear was just becoming old enough to have cubs. "What is really sad is that we have lost the potential that this grizzly bear represented for the further recovery of the threatened species in Alberta," he said Wednesday. He noted that grizzly bears are often killed after being struck on highways and by trains. "The fact that this bear was killed by a hunter illustrates the fact that there are many threats to these animals." The B.C. government plans to ban the killing of grizzly bears for trophy, but not until after this hunting season. Parks Canada and the Alberta government later confirmed the death of Bear 148. "This outcome underlines the need for more collaboration across jurisdictions to co-ordinate wildlife and people management at a landscape level," Parks Canada said in an email. Bear 148 was moved in July from its range near Banff and Canmore, Alta., to Kakwa Wildland Park. The bear never hurt anyone but had gotten too close to people dozens of times since it was born in the Banff National Park area six years ago. Over the summer the grizzly strayed onto a rugby field during a practice, charged a person walking with a stroller and chased dogs out for a walk with their owners. Murray Langdon, spokesman for Alberta's Environment and Parks, said staff did wh...

Calgary murder victim Nadia El-Dib laid to rest on Easter Sunday - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

CMP officer suffered minor injuries. Sgt. Brian Topham, 59, was airlifted to hospital in Edmonton after a bullet grazed his head. He was released on Sunday.READ MORE: Evansburg RCMP officer recovering after shootout with murder suspect west of EdmontonLet's block ads! (Why?)...

Aleta Williams, trailblazing journalist with deep church connection, dies at age 94 - TheChronicleHerald.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Jackie Jardine, editor of the Pictou Advocate and former community editor at The News. “She went to work at a time when most women were just entering the workforce and continued to work long after retirement. In fact, she was still writing newspaper columns when she was well into her 80s.” For 20 years, she worked as family and community editor for The Evening News and was known for putting people at ease. Widowed at a young age and while most of her children were still at home, she never missed their school, music or sports events. Nor did she cut back on her commitments to her church or her community involvement. “As a journalist, she knew her community,” said Dave Glenen, regional editor for Nova Scotia for Saltwire Network. “As we chased the fires, the mayors, the crime, she sought out the ordinary and drew out their stories. While most hoped not to be a target of some of our stories, all celebrated being in one of Aleta’s. It was common to hear on the weekends, people talking about the latest Aleta feature.” Throughout her career she believed passionately that everyone has a story to tell and immediately put people at ease in the telling while she listened without judgment. Her writings, saved in many treasured family scrapbooks and memory boxes, are a rich tapestry of Pictou County’s social history. They record the trials and triumphs of miners’ widows, ministers of congregations, kitchen entrepreneurs, social advocates, volunteers and hard-working people just trying to stretch a dollar to feed a family – in short, all people who are unlikely to appear in our conventional history books. William’s entered the field of journalism in the days of shorthand, typewriters, carbon paper, box cameras and ticker tape but through 40 years of change, her curiosity, her empathy, her commitment to do right by the people she covered and her adherence to deadlines remained constant. Details of funeral arrangements will be announced in the near future.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1561544-aleta-williams-trailblazing-journalist-with-deep-church-connection-dies-at-age-94

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

There’s one other thing I’d like to underscore,” he said, reflecting on his time in the parish. “I’m so pleased the parish was able to give hospitality to the seniors of Lillooet by offering the use of the parish hall, which has been a mutual blessing. I liked the idea as soon as I heard about it. I consulted the parishioners and they were very receptive. There was no official contract – it’s just based on a handshake. I said to the seniors, ‘If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Appeal ends, nearly $6000 raised - Sault Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Hunter Chamberlain and their son, Bentley, died last Tuesday. Their SUV, northbound on Highway 69 near Parry Sound, crossed the centre line and collided with a transport. The SUV caught fire. Ontario Provincial Police have not released the names of the deceased pending identification by Ontario Centre of Forensic Sciences. Whitehead's best friend, Rebecca Chapman, launched a GoFundMe appeal (https://www.gofundme.com/help-support-jodey-whitehead) on Friday to help Victoria's mother, Jodey Whitehead, pay for funeral costs. Her goal was $2,000. That target was exceeded by more than 50 per cent within 24 hours with $3,186 donated by 66 contributors by 10 a.m Saturday. By Sunday afternoon, the tally grew to $5,980 from 136 donors. In an update, Chapman thanked donors and said the appeal was finished. “As per request by the family, I will be closing donations and taking the funds to them,” she said. “They decided that this is an overwhelming, but very appreciated amount of support, and that they would like me to close the fund as we have reached nearly $6,000.”Many donors offered their condolences about the trio's death. “My heart goes out to anyone impacted by this tragedy,” said Danielle Heatley. “I can't imagine the pain of losing a child and grandchild,” said MaryClaire Wood in a post. “I pray you find the strength to deal with this terrible loss.“Thanks to everyone for their generosity,” said Jonathan White...
http://www.saultstar.com/2018/02/11/funeral-cost-appeal-tops-goal

Brockville area joins in mourning - Brockville Recorder and Times

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Humboldt later this week. https://t.co/DvpAsm2Ybw#HumboldtStrong#PutYourStickOut#XBRpic.twitter.com/h2EyHhQjrj — City of Brockville (@BrockvilleON) April 9, 2018Organizations across Ontario were paying tribute to the victims of last week’s fatal bus crash.The bus carrying the junior hockey team to a playoff game collided with a semi truck in northeast Saskatchewan on Friday, killing 15 people and leaving 14 others injured.The fatalities included 10 young teammates, ranging in age from 15 to 21, and five team personnel. Like many people across the country, the Wilsons placed a hockey stick on their porch in what has become a universal tribute to the lost players.The book of condolences is the product of city staff’s collaboration with Brockville’s Irvine Funeral Home.The tragedy also hit close to home for Mike Galbraith, a funeral director at Irvine who helped coordinate the book of condolences.“As a hockey dad, as a parent, as a funeral director, I can appreciate the chaos that’s going on,” he said.“Sometimes, people need an outlet.”Signing a book of condolences is a small way of confronting the powerlessness one feels in the wake of such a tragedy, said Galbraith.“This one’s kind of near and dear to the heart,” he added.“If I had the means and the time, I would fly out there today on a plane and help them out.”The Brockville Braves plan on contributing one dollar from every ticket sold to Tuesday’s Game at the Memorial Centre to a crowdsourcing fund for the victims. Galbraith said another version of the book of condolences will be set up at the arena ahead of that game.“It will all be added to one and sent off at the end of the week,” he added.Some 30 people had signed the city hall book as of mid-afternoon Monday, as word of the tribute began slowly to spread.Some of the people signing came from out of town, including Prescott, Mallorytown, Delta and Kingston.All of the local signatures and messages will be conveyed to Humboldt city hall.Elsewhere locally, organizers of the Brockville Winter Classic Weekend used their Facebook account to post tributes to the Broncos and a link to the crowdsourcing page.Brockville Mayor David Henderson said the scope of the tragedy extends beyond the world of hockey.“I think it wa...
http://www.recorder.ca/2018/04/09/brockville-area-joins-in-mourning

'They lost their goalie': Don Mills Flyers pay tribute to murder victim Roy Pejcinovski in emotional return to the ice - Toronto Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Flyers and Marlboros.  (Vince Talotta / Toronto Star)Pejcinovski was a promising prospect in next year’s Ontario Hockey League draft. “We remember him as a teammate and friend,” West said, urging the boys to “sit together, support each other, and keep playing the game.” And they did, but with a twist. The two teams tossed their sticks into pile at centre ice — with no discernible divide between Flyers and Marlboros. Players picked sticks at random, shuffling them like a deck of cards into two new teams.They then peeled their rival jerseys and put on new ones, black or white with a capital “R,” for Roy, in burgundy. The colour in the boys’ socks — orange and black for the Flye...