Chatham ON Funeral Homes

Chatham ON funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Chatham funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Alexander & Houle Funeral Home

245 Wellington St W
Chatham, ON N7M 1J9
(519) 352-2710

Bowman Funeral Home

4 Victoria Avenue
Chatham, ON N7L 2Z6
(519) 352-2390

Hinnegan-Peseski Funeral Home

156 William St. S.
Chatham, ON N7M 4S8
(519) 352-5120

McKinlay Funeral Home

459 St Clair St
Chatham, ON N7L 3K6
(519) 351-2040

St Paul's Anglican Church

18 Dolsen Rd
Chatham, ON N7M 5C9
(519) 354-5877

Chatham ON Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Clark Davey, 1928-2019: 'The true journalist of journalists' - Ottawa Citizen

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

According to Mills, Davey attended weekly round-table lunches at the Rideau Club, and at last week's, for example, was active and up-to-date discussing the SNC-Lavalin file.Davey was born in 1928 in Chatham, Ont. His career might have taken a completely different arc had his poor vision not kept him from attending Royal Roads Military College in B.C. He was heartbroken after failing his medical, but an English teacher told him that people would pay him to write. So he enrolled in the first journalism degree course taught at University of Western Ontario, graduating in 1948 and joining the newsroom of the Chatham Daily News.There, he worked under Richard "Dic" Doyle, but moved to Kirkland Lake when the Thomson newspaper chain made him editor-in-chief of the Northern Daily News. His time there was brief, however, as his girlfriend, Joyce Gordon, issued him an ultimatum: Northern Ontario or me. He chose her: they married in September 1952.In the meantime, he joined the newsroom of the Globe and Mail, where his mentor Doyle had been working for a year.As a reporter with the Globe, Davey covered national and international affairs, including the Suez Canal crisis, the St. Lawrence Seaway project and the cancellation of the Avro Arrow program. During the 1957 federal election campaign, he recognized that Tory leader John Diefenbaker was gaining momentum and might actually win, and convinced his editors to allow him to stay with the Chief's campaign for 40 days. Clark Davey, former publisher of the Montreal Gazette, displaying a mock-up of the paper's new Sunday edition in 1988. Bill Grimshaw / The Canadian Press When Doyle became editor of the Globe in 1963, he chose Davey as his managing editor, and, according to Mills, the two raised the broadsheet's reputation from that of a local paper to a national one. Davey was managing editor for 15 years before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1978. He was publisher there until 1983, when he took over at the Gazette. He was publisher of the Citizen from 1989 to 1993. He was also president and chair of The Canadian Press, and co-founder and president of the Michener Awards Foundation that oversees the country's most prestigious journalism prize."He was the true journalist of journalists," says Kim Kierans, journalism professor at University of King's College in Halifax and Michener Foundation board member. "He told me when I last saw him in November, ‘If we're not providing the encouragement for journalism organizations and journalists within them to do the journalism that matters, then we're in trouble as a democracy.'"He was also a lovely man, smart and sparkling … with incredible enthusiasm for the business and its future."According to Mills, Davey, who in 2002 led a protest on the steps of the Ottawa Citizen after Mills was fired for runni...
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/clark-davey-1928-2019-the-true-journalist-of-journalists

Kingston mourns the death of legendary local radio host Brian Scott - Global News

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

CeVGL8jJhf- 98.3 FLY FM (@983FLYFM) March 13, 2019His career began in his hometown of Chatham Ont., and he would later be hired to work at radio stations in London, Ottawa, Toronto and Kingston.Scott leaves behind his wife Deborah and daughter Logan.Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.WATCH: Former Calgary councillor, gardening radio host Barry Erskine dead at 73 Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://globalnews.ca/news/5053384/kingston-mourns-brian-scott/

Clark Davey, 1928-2019: 'The true journalist of journalists' - Chatham Daily News

Saturday, March 02, 2019

According to Mills, Davey attended weekly round-table lunches at the Rideau Club, and at last week's, for example, was active and up-to-date discussing the SNC-Lavalin file.Davey was born in 1928 in Chatham, Ont. His career might have taken a completely different arc had his poor vision not kept him from attending Royal Roads Military College in B.C. He was heartbroken after failing his medical, but an English teacher told him that people would pay him to write. So he enrolled in the first journalism degree course taught at University of Western Ontario, graduating in 1948 and joining the newsroom of the Chatham Daily News.There, he worked under Richard "Dic" Doyle, but moved to Kirkland Lake when the Thomson newspaper chain made him editor-in-chief of the Northern Daily News. His time there was brief, however, as his girlfriend, Joyce Gordon, issued him an ultimatum: Northern Ontario or me. He chose her: they married in September 1952.In the meantime, he joined the newsroom of the Globe and Mail, where his mentor Doyle had been working for a year.As a reporter with the Globe, Davey covered national and international affairs, including the Suez Canal crisis, the St. Lawrence Seaway project and the cancellation of the Avro Arrow program. During the 1957 federal election campaign, he recognized that Tory leader John Diefenbaker was gaining momentum and might actually win, and convinced his editors to allow him to stay with the Chief's campaign for 40 days. Clark Davey, former publisher of the Montreal Gazette, displaying a mock-up of the paper's new Sunday edition in 1988. Bill Grimshaw / The Canadian Press When Doyle became editor of the Globe in 1963, he chose Davey as his managing editor, and, according to Mills, the two raised the broadsheet's reputation from that of a local paper to a national one. Davey was managing editor for 15 years before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1978. He was publisher there until 1983, when he took over at the Gazette. He was publisher of the Citizen from 1989 to 1993. He was also president and chair of The Canadian Press, and co-founder and president of the Michener Awards Foundation that oversees the country's most prestigious journalism prize."He was the true journalist of journalists," says Kim Kierans, journalism professor at University of King's College in Halifax and Michener Foundation board member. "He told me when I last saw him in November, ‘If we're not providing the encouragement for journalism organizations and journalists within them to do the journalism that matters, then we're in trouble as a democracy.'"He was also a lovely man, smart and sparkling … with incredible enthusiasm for the business and its future."According to Mills, Davey, who in 2002 led a protest on the steps of the Ottawa Citizen after Mills was fired for running an editorial critical of then-pr...
https://www.chathamdailynews.ca/news/local-news/clark-davey-1928-2019-the-true-journalist-of-journalists/wcm/9ef282d7-dee7-4fec-a5aa-28da29d6c2ae

From 99 dead when train plunged through swing bridge to Lac-Mégantic: Canada's most deadly rail accidents - CBC News

Saturday, March 02, 2019

Desjardins Canal Bridge to let passengers walk across. (Library and Archives Canada)3. Baptiste Creek, near Chatham, Ont. Oct. 27, 1854 52 deadSeveral factors led to the collision of a gravel train and an express train that was running late, which resulted in 48 people injured and 52 dead on Oct. 27, 1854 - at the time, the worst rail crash in North America. It happened near Chatham, Ont., in an area known today as Jeannette's Creek.4. Lac-Mégantic, Que. July 6, 2013 47 deadOn July 6, 2013, 47 people died when a freight train loaded with 7.7 million litres of fuel rolled unmanned into the downtown core of Lac-Mégantic, Que., and exploded in the middle of the night. A Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found 18 factors in the crash that killed the victims, who ranged in age from four to 93. Among the factors, the TSB found an insufficient number of hand brakes had been applied. Transport Canada then toughened its standards, requiring companies to have more substantial "physical defences to prevent runaway equipment."There were many opportunities to avoid a deadly crash that killed 47 people in July, 2013. 0:475. West of Sudbury, Ont. Jan. 21, 1910 43 deadA passenger train left the tracks near the crossing west of Sudbury, at the Spanish River on Jan. 21, 1910. The first two rail cars fell into the freezing river below, killing 43 people. Speed and a broken rail were considered factors.6. Almonte, Ont. Dec. 27, 1942 39 deadDuring the Second World War, a train carrying troops from Alberta crashed into a passenger train sitting in the station in Almonte, Ont., on Dec. 27, 1942, injuring more than 200 people and killing 39. The passenger train was running behind schedule, with railway staff blaming the delay on stormy weather, icy tracks, a downgraded line and the congestion of holiday traffic. The conductor of the troop-laden train later killed himself.[embedded content]7. Dugald, Man. Sept. 1, 1947 31 deadA passenger train headed west failed to turn into a siding and crashed into an eastbound train in Dugald, Man., on Sept. 1, 1947. Wooden passenger cars were kept in service due to steel rationing during the Second World War and the fire was fed by the wood and the old cars' gas illumination. The crash and fire killed 31...
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/canada-deadly-rail-train-crashes-1.5006876

Seize the moment with Dan Aykroyd's National Caesar Day contest - Toronto Sun

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Crystal Head vodka, a unique brand manufactured in Newfoundland and Labrador that is one of the purest, made with “sweet peaches and cream corn grown in Chatham-Kent, Ont.,” and the pristine iceberg waters off Newfoundland and Labrador. The vodka is bottled in the iconic smiling glass skull, a vodka he founded with artist John Alexander back in 2007.“Crystal Head doesn’t have any additives, like glycerol, sugar or citrus oil. This is a very pure manufactured fluid, and I know bartenders around the world love it because it’s a blank canvas to which they add their own signature…gawd, I’d like to get a bottle into the hands of (actor) Jennifer Lawrence, given she’s a purist when it comes to enjoying a vodka martini,” added AykroydAykroyd is also involved with Caesar Day (which falls on May 17 this year) and a party being planned with a group of his buddies – that you can get invited to. “When I learned Canadians consumed more than 407 million Caesars last year alone and that a group of Caesar-loving Canadians created a day just to celebrate Canada’s Cocktail – I knew I wanted to be a part of it,” said Aykroyd.Now in its fourth year, the legendary actor is joining the team to create the official Caesar of 2018, which he calls the “The Hot Head Caesar,” a zesty take on the classic. Aykroyd blends fresh garlic, lime juice and Sriracha sauce with his own Crystal Head vodka and Mott’s Clamato – but what’s missing is the garnish. And that’s where you come in.Aykroyd is giving Canadians a chance to create a garnish worthy enough for his Caesar – and if you win, you get to enjoy the Caesar in person in Toronto with Aykroyd and his friends, on National Caesar Day, no less. Canadians from coast to coast can enter until May 2 – and yes, Dan will be judging – with the winner announced May 7.“A Caesar this great deserves something more inspired than a celery stalk,” said Aykroyd of his Hot Head Caesar. “I’ve seen Canadians create some spectacular garnishes over the years, so I want their help to choose the best one for my Caesar.”Personally, I’d go with something a little spooky – like a ghost pepper garnish. But that’s just me, after chatting with Dan.Check out GarnishDansCaesar.ca for more details. And may the best garnish win.CommentsShare your thoughtsDan Aykroyd Ghostbusters Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://torontosun.com/life/food/seize-the-moment-with-dan-aykroyds-national-caesar-day-contest

BRIAN DAVID MUEHLMAN - Burlington County Times

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Brian enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was an avid whitetail deer hunter, traveling throughout United States and Canada hunting with his grandson, Kurt. Brian was a USCG Charter Captain on Lake Ontario for 15 years. His most cherished time was spent with his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Gail Krauss Muehlman; his mother and step father, Margaret (Rex) Smith of Wexford; daughter, Candi (Joe) Landles of Evans City; step daughter, Becky Flagler of Pittsburgh; siblings, Connie Federbusch, Laurie (Ron) Mahen, and Mark (Pam) Muehlman, all of Mercer; nine grandchildren, Kurt, Mariah, Rayna, Seth, Brandon, Riley, Connor, Liam, and Nico; and several nieces and nephews. Brian was preceded in death by his father, Paul Muehlman and his brother in law, Oscar Federbusch. Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, from 2 to 8 p.m. at the MARSHALL FUNERAL HOME, 200 Fountain Ave., Ellwood City. Friends will also be received at the funeral home on Thursday from 10:30 a.m. until the time of the blessing service at 11:30 a.m. Rev. Father Mark Thomas will officiate. Interment will follow in Holy Redeemer Cemetery. Memorial contributions in Brian's memory may be made to the Steven King Foundation, 621 Street, Jetmore, KS 67854 or Victory Junction, 4500 Adams Way, Randalman, NC 27317. Online condolences may be sent to marshallsfh. com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/obituaries/20190319/brian-david-muehlman

Clark Davey, 1928-2019: 'The true journalist of journalists' - Ottawa Citizen

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

He was heartbroken after failing his medical, but an English teacher told him that people would pay him to write. So he enrolled in the first journalism degree course taught at University of Western Ontario, graduating in 1948 and joining the newsroom of the Chatham Daily News.There, he worked under Richard "Dic" Doyle, but moved to Kirkland Lake when the Thomson newspaper chain made him editor-in-chief of the Northern Daily News. His time there was brief, however, as his girlfriend, Joyce Gordon, issued him an ultimatum: Northern Ontario or me. He chose her: they married in September 1952.In the meantime, he joined the newsroom of the Globe and Mail, where his mentor Doyle had been working for a year.As a reporter with the Globe, Davey covered national and international affairs, including the Suez Canal crisis, the St. Lawrence Seaway project and the cancellation of the Avro Arrow program. During the 1957 federal election campaign, he recognized that Tory leader John Diefenbaker was gaining momentum and might actually win, and convinced his editors to allow him to stay with the Chief's campaign for 40 days. Clark Davey, former publisher of the Montreal Gazette, displaying a mock-up of the paper's new Sunday edition in 1988. Bill Grimshaw / The Canadian Press When Doyle became editor of the Globe in 1963, he chose Davey as his managing editor, and, according to Mills, the two raised the broadsheet's reputation from that of a local paper to a national one. Davey was managing editor for 15 years before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1978. He was publisher there until 1983, when he took over at the Gazette. He was publisher of the Citizen from 1989 to 1993. He was also president and chair of The Canadian Press, and co-founder and president of the Michener Awards Foundation that oversees the country's most prestigious journalism prize."He was the true journalist of journalists," says Kim Kierans, journalism professor at University of King's College in Halifax and Michener Foundation board member. "He told me when I last saw him in November, ‘If we're not providing the encouragement for journalism organizations and journalists within them to do the journalism that matters, then we're in trouble as a democracy.'"He was also a lovely man, smart and sparkling … with incredible enthusiasm for the business and its future."According to Mills, Davey, who in 2002 led a protest on the steps of the Ottawa Citizen after Mills was fired for running an editorial critical of then-prime minister Jean Chrétien, was known as tough and gruff, "but deep down he was a really kind and thoughtful person, and a very good friend who was always fair to people. But if you didn't know him, he could be intimidating."And although he called the shots on the job, it was Joyce who ruled the home roost. According to son Ric, his father only stopped the presses twice - once while at the Globe, when Joyce called him to report that she and Ric thought they had just seen a UFO."That was the kind of pull she had over him," says Ric.Clark Davey is survived by his wife, Joyce; brother Kenneth George; children Ric (Rita Celli), Kevin (Margaret) and Clark Jr. (...
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/clark-davey-1928-2019-the-true-journalist-of-journalists

Cecile J. Briggs - WatertownDailyTimes.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. There will be no funeral services and burial will be at a later date in Calvary Cemetery, Massena.Cecile was born on November 14, 1933 in Cornwall, Ontario, the daughter of Claude and Bertha (Belanger) Villeneuve. She married Joseph Maugeri Jr. on February 21, 1958. He predeceased her on April 19, 1972. She later married Ivan Briggs on June 20, 1975. He predeceased her in June 2001.She enjoyed playing bingo, traveling and spending time on social media.She is survived by her son Joseph Maugeri III and his wife Becky of Clayville, NY; three grandchildren, Joseph, Benjamin and Matthew Maugeri; a brother, Cyril and wife Sylvia Villeneuve and two sisters, Claudette Lefebvre and Bernadette Good as well as several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two sisters Bernice Sequin and Marie Claire Payette.Arrangements are under the direction of Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. Memories and online condolences may be share with the family at www.PhillipsMemorial.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.watertowndailytimes.com/obit/cecile-j-briggs-20190316