Caledonia ON Funeral Homes

Caledonia ON funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Caledonia funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Express your deepest sympathy - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Wonderful way to honor the life and memory of a cherished friend or loved one.

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

All white shimmering blossoms symbolize peace, love, and tranquility.

Miller Funeral Chapel

28 Caithness St E
Caledonia, ON N3W 1B7
(905) 765-2712

St. Patrick's Catholic Church

107 Orkney St E
Caledonia, ON N3W 1C4
(905) 765-2729

Caledonia ON Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Death Notices - February 2019 - Port Dover Maple Leaf

Saturday, March 02, 2019

James, and his sister Sheila. Reb retired from Stelco after 20+ years service and was active on the retirement committee for United Steelworkers Local 8782. He had great memories of his farm in Caledonia where he loved spending time with family and friends. Reb was the former President and Life Member of the Black Hawks Motorcycle Club, Hamilton. Port Dover's Friday 13th was a day he always enjoyed. He was also a former member of the band RD and The 30 Day Plan. Reb was well known in the Port Dover area and will be sadly missed by his many friends. Friends were invited to meet with the family to share their memories of Reb on Saturday, February 23, 2019 from 2 to 6 p.m. at Thompson Waters Funeral Home, 102 First Ave., Port Dover (519-583-1530). Cremation followed. For those wishing, donations to the Port Dover Life Line Food Bank would be appreciated. On-line donations and/or condolences can be made at www.thompsonwatersfuneralhome.ca John RichardsonRICHARDSON, John Kenneth — passed away peacefully after a brief illness at the Juravinski Hospital in Hamilton on Saturday, February 24, 2019, at the age of 62, with his loving family at his bedside. Darling husband and best friend of Ellen Coffey. Adored father of Jennifer, Kenneth, Stuart and Ian (Jillian). Protective and doting Grandpa to Myles. Beloved son of Victor Richardson and predeceased by mother Jean Richardson (1998). Much loved brother and brother-in-law of Bob (Allie), Cathy, Judy (Randy), Diane (Daniel), and Rose. Predeceased by brothers-in-law Paul (2014) and Tom (2016). Loved and missed by many nieces and nephews, and grand-nieces and nephews. John embraced the outdoors and was an avid woodsman and hunter. A natural teacher, he shared his knowledge and passion with others. He dearly loved his family and always put them first. John placed great value on friendship and had a wide group of friends including many that date back to his school years. After graduating from Sir Sanford Fleming College, John worked for over 25 years at the Equipment Centre in Simcoe and Woodstock. He spent the last 10 years of his career as the Lift Bridge Foreman in Port Dover, before retiring in 2013. During his retirement he and Ellen enjoyed travelling, hiking and spending time at their cherished cottage that he built on Manitoulin Island. Friends are invited to share their memories of John with his family at the Jason Smith Funeral Chapel, 689 Norfolk St. N., Simcoe for visitation on Friday, March 1, 2019 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. John's funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. Private interment of ashes at a later date. Those wishing to donate in memory of John are asked to consider the Canadian Sepsis Foundation. Pers...
https://www.portdovermapleleaf.com/death-notices-february-2019/

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Kelly was described as "the voice and incarnation of healthcare reform in the north."Kelly's other achievements included bringing several lab training programs to the College of New Caledonia and the opening of the B.C. Cancer Centre for the North in Prince George so patients would not have to travel to other parts of the province to receive treatment. He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied.- Susan ScottScott said Kelly was unafraid to speak out about problems."He'd tell you the truth even if you didn't want to hear it," she said."He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied."Prince George-Valemount MLA Shirley Bond described Kelly as a "catalyst for change" in a Tweet thanking him for his advocacy.In a 2014 interview with CBC, Kelly continued to raise alarm bells about the lack of health care services in northern B.C., citing a lack of physiotherapists, speech pathologists and other specialists and asked for funding to have them trained in the region, as well."For better than 100 years now we've been training professionals in the Lower Mainland, hoping they will move north," he said. "But they don't... I think if you've been trying something for 100 years and it hasn't worked, it might be time to re-examine the model."Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north ... - CBC.ca

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Kelly was described as "the voice and incarnation of healthcare reform in the north."Kelly's other achievements included bringing several lab training programs to the College of New Caledonia and the opening of the B.C. Cancer Centre for the North in Prince George so patients would not have to travel to other parts of the province to receive treatment. He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied.- Susan ScottScott said Kelly was unafraid to speak out about problems."He'd tell you the truth even if you didn't want to hear it," she said."He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied."Prince George-Valemount MLA Shirley Bond described Kelly as a "catalyst for change" in a Tweet thanking him for his advocacy.In a 2014 interview with CBC, Kelly continued to raise alarm bells about the lack of health care services in northern B.C., citing a lack of physiotherapists, speech pathologists and other specialists and asked for funding to have them trained in the region, as well."For better than 100 years now we've been training professionals in the Lower Mainland, hoping they will move north," he said. "But they don't... I think if you've been trying something for 100 years and it hasn't worked, it might be time to re-examine the model."Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

Ex-football player tackling cancer - Prince George Citizen

Thursday, September 14, 2017

You can't ask for a better support network if you're teenager fighting a really rare battle." Jake, who turns 18 on Oct. 31, graduated in June from Duchess Park and now attends the College of New Caledonia, studying computer network electronic technology. He works part-time at Starbucks in College Heights and volunteers for the Canadian Cancer Society as part of Team Diller at the annual Run For the Cure in May and also helps out at the Inside Ride to Conquer Cancer in October."If I'm still alive and can do things I'm going to do that until I can't anymore, I'll still try to do what I can," he said. "I know (losing his leg) is an inevitability but I can't be put down by that, I still have to keep moving forward." Jake first complained about leg pain and the fact his pant leg was getting tighter when he was 14. He was diagnosed in 2014 and was given 50 bouts of low-dose chemotherapy. At 15, he had 28 radiation treatments but the tumours continued to grow. Nearly unable to walk due to swelling, with the tumours blocking the flow of blood in his leg, he had his first surgery when he was 16, needing 87 stables to close the wounds, but it didn't stop the cancer from returning. The largest tumour he now has runs from his calf to mid-thigh and is 30 centimetres long and 10 cm in diameter."These tumours get very angry when you touch them and the minute you do a surgery or biopsy they get angry and grow a lot of times," said Carrie. "But they're so rare, there's no traditional clinical trials because people aren't responding the same way."Unfortunately it's incurable right now and we have no way to get them to stop at this point, so he's one of the very few kids to have personalized oncogenomics (POG) treatment, which is targeted gene therapy."POG has proven effective in fighting some types of aggressive cancer. Jake just returned from Vancouver, where he was given cryoablation treatment, in which a super-cooled gas is injected into the tumours. He'll have that every three months."We're trying to avoid amputation because even if we amputate, another tumour will come back for him," said Carrie. "Fibroblasts, which are how some of these tumours react, are like scar tissue for us and it heals. But in his case it keeps coming back and creating new tumours."Jake is the only minor under the care of the B.C. Cancer Centre of the North at UHNBC and unfortunately for him, an MRI exam nine months in March 2016 failed to detect the tumour that showed up last December. Rather than express anger that it wasn't diagnosed earlier, Carrie said he gave his doctor a hug and told her," You're just the messenger, you didn't give me my cancer."Jake has had his moments of depression and anger dealing with his life-threatening condition but says there's no point in dwelling on the negatives and moping about what's happened to him."I just keep moving forward because I know I have to, there's going to be no end to this and there's no point in stopping," he said. "You know you have more treatments ahead of you and it's going to get worse and you have to stay strong and keep telling yourself that this can't beat you, you're better than this."This weekend the Northland Dodge Prince George Senior Baseball League is organizing two fundraising events at Citizen Field for Jake to help him and his family pay their travel expenses while he's receiving medical treatments in Vancouver. Many of those costs are not covered because he's treated at Vancouver General Hospital rather than at B.C. Children's Hospital.The league's home run derby starts at 7 p.m. tonight at Citizen Field and the all-star game is on Sunday at 2 p.m. Jake hasn't played much baseball in his life but says he'll probably take a few...
http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/ex-football-player-tackling-cancer-1.22725776

MJ Hatzenbihler - Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, July 05, 2017

Jill (Steve) Bosch, Strasburg, Arliss (Joseph) Mahrer, Garibaldi, Ore., Gail (Jim) Morton, Edson, Alberta, Canada, Denise (Jim) Brorby, Beulah, and Raylene (Ernie) Vettel, Caledonia; his sons, Neal (Linda), Pinehaven, Wyo., Dean (Crystal), Salem, Ore., Kevin (Kimberly) Gillette, Wyo., and Brian (Leia), Alvord, Texas; a daughter-in-law, Trudy Hatzenbihler, Billings, Mont.; 24 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren; a sister, Elizabeth Haag, Center; brother, Ralph (Louise), Mandan; his sisters-in-law, Barbara Hatzenbihler, Frances Kary, and Beverly Moonl; along with numerous nieces and nephews.M.J. was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Cecelia; his sons, Scott and infant son, Keith; his sisters, Mary (Martin) Emineth, Beata (John) Haag, and Rose (Bill) Jahner; his brothers, Jack (Magdlyn), Matt (Adeline), John, Pete (Betty), and Frank (Darlene); a brother-in-law, Jake Haag, George Kary; his sisters-in-law, Viola (Mike) Himmelspach, and Jeanette (Myron) Brown.In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials to the North Dakota Veterans Cemetery or the Golden Age Club in Center.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://bismarcktribune.com/news/obituaries/m-j-hatzenbihler/article_346c121f-56c4-5507-b8e8-78995706f25e.html

BRIAN DAVID MUEHLMAN - Burlington County Times

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Brian enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was an avid whitetail deer hunter, traveling throughout United States and Canada hunting with his grandson, Kurt. Brian was a USCG Charter Captain on Lake Ontario for 15 years. His most cherished time was spent with his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Gail Krauss Muehlman; his mother and step father, Margaret (Rex) Smith of Wexford; daughter, Candi (Joe) Landles of Evans City; step daughter, Becky Flagler of Pittsburgh; siblings, Connie Federbusch, Laurie (Ron) Mahen, and Mark (Pam) Muehlman, all of Mercer; nine grandchildren, Kurt, Mariah, Rayna, Seth, Brandon, Riley, Connor, Liam, and Nico; and several nieces and nephews. Brian was preceded in death by his father, Paul Muehlman and his brother in law, Oscar Federbusch. Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, from 2 to 8 p.m. at the MARSHALL FUNERAL HOME, 200 Fountain Ave., Ellwood City. Friends will also be received at the funeral home on Thursday from 10:30 a.m. until the time of the blessing service at 11:30 a.m. Rev. Father Mark Thomas will officiate. Interment will follow in Holy Redeemer Cemetery. Memorial contributions in Brian's memory may be made to the Steven King Foundation, 621 Street, Jetmore, KS 67854 or Victory Junction, 4500 Adams Way, Randalman, NC 27317. Online condolences may be sent to marshallsfh. com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/obituaries/20190319/brian-david-muehlman

Cecile J. Briggs - WatertownDailyTimes.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. There will be no funeral services and burial will be at a later date in Calvary Cemetery, Massena.Cecile was born on November 14, 1933 in Cornwall, Ontario, the daughter of Claude and Bertha (Belanger) Villeneuve. She married Joseph Maugeri Jr. on February 21, 1958. He predeceased her on April 19, 1972. She later married Ivan Briggs on June 20, 1975. He predeceased her in June 2001.She enjoyed playing bingo, traveling and spending time on social media.She is survived by her son Joseph Maugeri III and his wife Becky of Clayville, NY; three grandchildren, Joseph, Benjamin and Matthew Maugeri; a brother, Cyril and wife Sylvia Villeneuve and two sisters, Claudette Lefebvre and Bernadette Good as well as several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two sisters Bernice Sequin and Marie Claire Payette.Arrangements are under the direction of Phillips Memorial Home in Massena. Memories and online condolences may be share with the family at www.PhillipsMemorial.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.watertowndailytimes.com/obit/cecile-j-briggs-20190316

Clark Davey, 1928-2019: 'The true journalist of journalists' - Ottawa Citizen

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

He was heartbroken after failing his medical, but an English teacher told him that people would pay him to write. So he enrolled in the first journalism degree course taught at University of Western Ontario, graduating in 1948 and joining the newsroom of the Chatham Daily News.There, he worked under Richard "Dic" Doyle, but moved to Kirkland Lake when the Thomson newspaper chain made him editor-in-chief of the Northern Daily News. His time there was brief, however, as his girlfriend, Joyce Gordon, issued him an ultimatum: Northern Ontario or me. He chose her: they married in September 1952.In the meantime, he joined the newsroom of the Globe and Mail, where his mentor Doyle had been working for a year.As a reporter with the Globe, Davey covered national and international affairs, including the Suez Canal crisis, the St. Lawrence Seaway project and the cancellation of the Avro Arrow program. During the 1957 federal election campaign, he recognized that Tory leader John Diefenbaker was gaining momentum and might actually win, and convinced his editors to allow him to stay with the Chief's campaign for 40 days. Clark Davey, former publisher of the Montreal Gazette, displaying a mock-up of the paper's new Sunday edition in 1988. Bill Grimshaw / The Canadian Press When Doyle became editor of the Globe in 1963, he chose Davey as his managing editor, and, according to Mills, the two raised the broadsheet's reputation from that of a local paper to a national one. Davey was managing editor for 15 years before joining the Vancouver Sun in 1978. He was publisher there until 1983, when he took over at the Gazette. He was publisher of the Citizen from 1989 to 1993. He was also president and chair of The Canadian Press, and co-founder and president of the Michener Awards Foundation that oversees the country's most prestigious journalism prize."He was the true journalist of journalists," says Kim Kierans, journalism professor at University of King's College in Halifax and Michener Foundation board member. "He told me when I last saw him in November, ‘If we're not providing the encouragement for journalism organizations and journalists within them to do the journalism that matters, then we're in trouble as a democracy.'"He was also a lovely man, smart and sparkling … with incredible enthusiasm for the business and its future."According to Mills, Davey, who in 2002 led a protest on the steps of the Ottawa Citizen after Mills was fired for running an editorial critical of then-prime minister Jean Chrétien, was known as tough and gruff, "but deep down he was a really kind and thoughtful person, and a very good friend who was always fair to people. But if you didn't know him, he could be intimidating."And although he called the shots on the job, it was Joyce who ruled the home roost. According to son Ric, his father only stopped the presses twice - once while at the Globe, when Joyce called him to report that she and Ric thought they had just seen a UFO."That was the kind of pull she had over him," says Ric.Clark Davey is survived by his wife, Joyce; brother Kenneth George; children Ric (Rita Celli), Kevin (Margaret) and Clark Jr. (...
https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/clark-davey-1928-2019-the-true-journalist-of-journalists