Caledonia ON Funeral Homes

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Miller Funeral Chapel

28 Caithness St E
Caledonia, ON N3W 1B7
(905) 765-2712

St. Patrick's Catholic Church

107 Orkney St E
Caledonia, ON N3W 1C4
(905) 765-2729

Caledonia ON Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Death Notices - February 2019 - Port Dover Maple Leaf

Saturday, March 2, 2019

James, and his sister Sheila. Reb retired from Stelco after 20+ years service and was active on the retirement committee for United Steelworkers Local 8782. He had great memories of his farm in Caledonia where he loved spending time with family and friends. Reb was the former President and Life Member of the Black Hawks Motorcycle Club, Hamilton. Port Dover's Friday 13th was a day he always enjoyed. He was also a former member of the band RD and The 30 Day Plan. Reb was well known in the Port Dover area and will be sadly missed by his many friends. Friends were invited to meet with the family to share their memories of Reb on Saturday, February 23, 2019 from 2 to 6 p.m. at Thompson Waters Funeral Home, 102 First Ave., Port Dover (519-583-1530). Cremation followed. For those wishing, donations to the Port Dover Life Line Food Bank would be appreciated. On-line donations and/or condolences can be made at www.thompsonwatersfuneralhome.ca John RichardsonRICHARDSON, John Kenneth — passed away peacefully after a brief illness at the Juravinski Hospital in Hamilton on Saturday, February 24, 2019, at the age of 62, with his loving family at his bedside. Darling husband and best friend of Ellen Coffey. Adored father of Jennifer, Kenneth, Stuart and Ian (Jillian). Protective and doting Grandpa to Myles. Beloved son of Victor Richardson and predeceased by mother Jean Richardson (1998). Much loved brother and brother-in-law of Bob (Allie), Cathy, Judy (Randy), Diane (Daniel), and Rose. Predeceased by brothers-in-law Paul (2014) and Tom (2016). Loved and missed by many nieces and nephews, and grand-nieces and nephews. John embraced the outdoors and was an avid woodsman and hunter. A natural teacher, he shared his knowledge and passion with others. He dearly loved his family and always put them first. John placed great value on friendship and had a wide group of friends including many that date back to his school years. After graduating from Sir Sanford Fleming College, John worked for over 25 years at the Equipment Centre in Simcoe and Woodstock. He spent the last 10 years of his career as the Lift Bridge Foreman in Port Dover, before retiring in 2013. During his retirement he and Ellen enjoyed travelling, hiking and spending time at their cherished cottage that he built on Manitoulin Island. Friends are invited to share their memories of John with his family at the Jason Smith Funeral Chapel, 689 Norfolk St. N., Simcoe for visitation on Friday, March 1, 2019 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. John's funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. Private interment of ashes at a later date. Those wishing to donate in memory of John are asked to consider the Canadian Sepsis Foundation. Pers...
https://www.portdovermapleleaf.com/death-notices-february-2019/

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Kelly was described as "the voice and incarnation of healthcare reform in the north."Kelly's other achievements included bringing several lab training programs to the College of New Caledonia and the opening of the B.C. Cancer Centre for the North in Prince George so patients would not have to travel to other parts of the province to receive treatment. He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied.- Susan ScottScott said Kelly was unafraid to speak out about problems."He'd tell you the truth even if you didn't want to hear it," she said."He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied."Prince George-Valemount MLA Shirley Bond described Kelly as a "catalyst for change" in a Tweet thanking him for his advocacy.In a 2014 interview with CBC, Kelly continued to raise alarm bells about the lack of health care services in northern B.C., citing a lack of physiotherapists, speech pathologists and other specialists and asked for funding to have them trained in the region, as well."For better than 100 years now we've been training professionals in the Lower Mainland, hoping they will move north," he said. "But they don't... I think if you've been trying something for 100 years and it hasn't worked, it might be time to re-examine the model."Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north ... - CBC.ca

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Kelly was described as "the voice and incarnation of healthcare reform in the north."Kelly's other achievements included bringing several lab training programs to the College of New Caledonia and the opening of the B.C. Cancer Centre for the North in Prince George so patients would not have to travel to other parts of the province to receive treatment. He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied.- Susan ScottScott said Kelly was unafraid to speak out about problems."He'd tell you the truth even if you didn't want to hear it," she said."He could be, quite frankly, a real pain in the ass, but it was very timely and necessary when it was applied."Prince George-Valemount MLA Shirley Bond described Kelly as a "catalyst for change" in a Tweet thanking him for his advocacy.In a 2014 interview with CBC, Kelly continued to raise alarm bells about the lack of health care services in northern B.C., citing a lack of physiotherapists, speech pathologists and other specialists and asked for funding to have them trained in the region, as well."For better than 100 years now we've been training professionals in the Lower Mainland, hoping they will move north," he said. "But they don't... I think if you've been trying something for 100 years and it hasn't worked, it might be time to re-examine the model."Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

Ex-football player tackling cancer - Prince George Citizen

Thursday, September 14, 2017

You can't ask for a better support network if you're teenager fighting a really rare battle." Jake, who turns 18 on Oct. 31, graduated in June from Duchess Park and now attends the College of New Caledonia, studying computer network electronic technology. He works part-time at Starbucks in College Heights and volunteers for the Canadian Cancer Society as part of Team Diller at the annual Run For the Cure in May and also helps out at the Inside Ride to Conquer Cancer in October."If I'm still alive and can do things I'm going to do that until I can't anymore, I'll still try to do what I can," he said. "I know (losing his leg) is an inevitability but I can't be put down by that, I still have to keep moving forward." Jake first complained about leg pain and the fact his pant leg was getting tighter when he was 14. He was diagnosed in 2014 and was given 50 bouts of low-dose chemotherapy. At 15, he had 28 radiation treatments but the tumours continued to grow. Nearly unable to walk due to swelling, with the tumours blocking the flow of blood in his leg, he had his first surgery when he was 16, needing 87 stables to close the wounds, but it didn't stop the cancer from returning. The largest tumour he now has runs from his calf to mid-thigh and is 30 centimetres long and 10 cm in diameter."These tumours get very angry when you touch them and the minute you do a surgery or biopsy they get angry and grow a lot of times," said Carrie. "But they're so rare, there's no traditional clinical trials because people aren't responding the same way."Unfortunately it's incurable right now and we have no way to get them to stop at this point, so he's one of the very few kids to have personalized oncogenomics (POG) treatment, which is targeted gene therapy."POG has proven effective in fighting some types of aggressive cancer. Jake just returned from Vancouver, where he was given cryoablation treatment, in which a super-cooled gas is injected into the tumours. He'll have that every three months."We're trying to avoid amputation because even if we amputate, another tumour will come back for him," said Carrie. "Fibroblasts, which are how some of these tumours react, are like scar tissue for us and it heals. But in his case it keeps coming back and creating new tumours."Jake is the only minor under the care of the B.C. Cancer Centre of the North at UHNBC and unfortunately for him, an MRI exam nine months in March 2016 failed to detect the tumour that showed up last December. Rather than express anger that it wasn't diagnosed earlier, Carrie said he gave his doctor a hug and told her," You're just the messenger, you didn't give me my cancer."Jake has had his moments of depression and anger dealing with his life-threatening condition but says there's no point in dwelling on the negatives and moping about what's happened to him."I just keep moving forward because I know I have to, there's going to be no end to this and there's no point in stopping," he said. "You know you have more treatments ahead of you and it's going to get worse and you have to stay strong and keep telling yourself that this can't beat you, you're better than this."This weekend the Northland Dodge Prince George Senior Baseball League is organizing two fundraising events at Citizen Field for Jake to help him and his family pay their travel expenses while he's receiving medical treatments in Vancouver. Many of those costs are not covered because he's treated at Vancouver General Hospital rather than at B.C. Children's Hospital.The league's home run derby starts at 7 p.m. tonight at Citizen Field and the all-star game is on Sunday at 2 p.m. Jake hasn't played much baseball in his life but says he'll probably take a few...
http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/ex-football-player-tackling-cancer-1.22725776

MJ Hatzenbihler - Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Jill (Steve) Bosch, Strasburg, Arliss (Joseph) Mahrer, Garibaldi, Ore., Gail (Jim) Morton, Edson, Alberta, Canada, Denise (Jim) Brorby, Beulah, and Raylene (Ernie) Vettel, Caledonia; his sons, Neal (Linda), Pinehaven, Wyo., Dean (Crystal), Salem, Ore., Kevin (Kimberly) Gillette, Wyo., and Brian (Leia), Alvord, Texas; a daughter-in-law, Trudy Hatzenbihler, Billings, Mont.; 24 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren; a sister, Elizabeth Haag, Center; brother, Ralph (Louise), Mandan; his sisters-in-law, Barbara Hatzenbihler, Frances Kary, and Beverly Moonl; along with numerous nieces and nephews.M.J. was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Cecelia; his sons, Scott and infant son, Keith; his sisters, Mary (Martin) Emineth, Beata (John) Haag, and Rose (Bill) Jahner; his brothers, Jack (Magdlyn), Matt (Adeline), John, Pete (Betty), and Frank (Darlene); a brother-in-law, Jake Haag, George Kary; his sisters-in-law, Viola (Mike) Himmelspach, and Jeanette (Myron) Brown.In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials to the North Dakota Veterans Cemetery or the Golden Age Club in Center.Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://bismarcktribune.com/news/obituaries/m-j-hatzenbihler/article_346c121f-56c4-5507-b8e8-78995706f25e.html

11-year-old Riya Rajkumar remembered as a dreamer - CTV News Windsor

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Last Updated Wednesday, February 20, 2019 7:05PM EST BRAMPTON, Ont. -- An 11-year-old girl allegedly killed by her father in southern Ontario was a dreamer, a dancer and a singer who "always saw the good in every situation." It was standing room only at an Etobicoke funeral home as friends and family of Rajkumar gathered on Wednesday. In a eulogy delivered during the Hindu service, which was held at the Lotus Funeral and Cremation Centre on Wednesday morning, Riya was described as a "positive child" who loved life and "saw the good in every situation." On Tuesday night, about 100 mourners gathered to listen to speeches, poems and songs as the community remembered Riya Rajkumar in Brampton, Ont. "My daughter Riya was taken from me too early," Priya Ramdin, who did not attend the vigil, said in a statement read by Peel police Deputy Chief Chris McCord. "She never liked to be negative and always saw the good in every situation. If I'm ever upset, she would say 'Mama, don't be sad, look at the positives."' The day Riya died -- Valentine's Day -- was also her and her mother's birthdays. "Early that day, we went to do our nails and her choice of colour was red," Ramdin said. "She was so excited for her birthday, looking forward to having dinner later that evening. Never did I think that my daughter woul...
https://windsor.ctvnews.ca/11-year-old-riya-rajkumar-remembered-as-a-dreamer-1.4304744

Albert Frank Czapski - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Park. He was preceded in death by a twin sister, Alberta Dorsey. Albert was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Westville. He was an avid fisherman and enjoyed remote fly-fishing trips to Ontario, Canada, and golfing. He was a graduate of Westville High School, where he played football. He owned and operated Flip's Tavern for 35 years. He worked at Allied Chemical for 35 years and Thirion Glass for five years. He was on the Westville Fire Department and was former president of Westville-Belgium Sanitary District. Private services and entombment were held at Resurrection Cemetery Mausoleum, Danville, with Fr. Robert Hoffmann officiating. Memorials may be made to Westville Public Library. Rortvedt Funeral Services, Tilton, assisted the family. Online condolences at rortvedtfuneralservices.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.news-gazette.com/obituaries/2019-02-04/albert-frank-czapski.html

'A launching pad to start over': Three women find new lives with support of Kingston Interval House - The Kingston Whig-Standard

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Australia.She described their life Down Under as "very comfortable," and admitted their new one in Kingston was a significant transition. She wants to work, but she's found that Ontario's social assistance has made it next to impossible. She said the problem is that if you earn more than $500 a month, the province starts taxing it dollar-for-dollar up to 50 per cent. After 50 per cent, a person loses social assistance and any benefits, she said."It makes it frightening. I know why people don't want to get off of it," Wiwchar said."I went to an employment agency and was told basically I'm unemployable to them … I went home and I cried. How am I unemployable? I worked as a medic, as a makeup artist, I managed retail, and I have office training."Kerry is also on disability due to severe arthritis and is diagnosed bipolar. Her life has not been an easy one. In the winter of 2016 she says police recommended she reach out to Interval House because her ex-boyfriend, who constantly assaulted and stole from Kerry, had been released on parole and hadn't attended his halfway house."He just came and went as he pleased," Kerry said of her relationship with the man. "His whole family for six years just totally took over my life … he would inject me [with hydromorphone] while I was sleeping."At one point, she said, he kept her overdosed for three days so that he could steal her medications. Her 10-year-old son and dog at the time waited for her to wake."My son just laid with me," Kerry said. "He should have called an ambulance but he was afraid he'd be taken away."Taking her medications left her mentally unstable and unable to fully care for herself. Eventually it hospitalized her for five months, forcing Family and Children's Services of Frontenac, Lennox and Addington to take her preteen son away.Kerry was once a successful medical secretary. She says she was good at her job, but she was addicted to crack cocaine. She was introduced to the drug by another former partner who was also abusive.When she learned that her former partner was being released and was on the run, she was scared that he'd kill her. She called Interval House, stayed in the shelter for six months, and then lived in one of Robin's Hope's accessible units for nearly a year and a half.Kerry has been clean for three and a half years and gives back to Interval House by running painting classes at Robin's Hope. Kerry has also done her best to separate herself from destructive people, and while her sister has custody of her son, she said that relationship is becoming stronger every visit.Kerry explains you have to want to get better."I wanted to do the programs. You don't realize about how naive you are about red flags [in relationships] and boundaries," Kerry said. "I didn't realize how much of a sucker I felt I was, but also how mentally unhealthy I felt that I was to let someone control my mind like that. Call you stupid, make you feel less than."Making Claire feel she was "less than" was her former spouse's strategy to control her. A highly educated woman with a doctorate, Claire was often invited to speak at conferences around the wo...
https://www.thewhig.com/news/local-news/a-launching-pad-to-start-over-three-women-find-new-lives-with-support-of-kingston-interval-house