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Whattam Funeral Home

Whattam Funeral Home in Picton Ontario provides local funeral services. It is located at 33 Main Street in Picton, ON with a postal code of K0K 2T0. Call Whattam Funeral Home for more information about funeral and memorial services, preplanning and funeral arrangements. Before visiting the funeral home, be sure to verify its address, hours of operation, and if going to someone's funeral - funeral visitation and service times. The telephone number is 613-476-2450.

  • Name:
    Whattam Funeral Home
    Address:
    33 Main Street
    City:
    Picton
    Province:
    Ontario
    Postal Code:
    K0K 2T0
    Phone:
    613-476-2450
  • Flower Delivery to this Funeral Home

View the maps of Whattam Funeral Home and find driving direction to 33 Main Street in Picton, ON K0K 2T0. The geocodes coordinates are 44.0034 -77.152.

Whattam Funeral Home is one of the funeral service providers in Picton, Ontario. Listed below are other nearby funeral homes, Churches, memorial chapels, cemeteries, crematoriums and mortuaries. Select closest funeral homes to Whattam Funeral Home for more information or browse by surrounding cities below.

Funeral Homes in Picton ON
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Whattam Funeral Home Obituaries/ Death Notices

A Bite-Size Square of Canada’s History, Culture and Craving - The New York Times

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

AdvertisementSupported byA Bite-Size Square of Canada's History, Culture and CravingHow the Nanaimo bar, a three-layer no-bake treat from British Columbia, conquered a nation's palate.ImageThe Nanaimo bar is a distinctively Canadian no-bake treat named for a city on Vancouver Island.CreditCreditCon Poulos for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Christine Albano.By Sara BonisteelMarch 22, 2019The Canadian city of Nanaimo, in British Columbia, has been a scrappy outpost of the Hudson's Bay Company, a coal mining center and a timber town. But its place in history may be forever entwined with its culinary namesake, one of the world's sweetest treats.The Nanaimo bar (pronounced nuh-NYE-mo) is a three-layer no-bake square that for the last seven decades or so has been a steadfast source of comfort to Canadians at weddings and funerals, birthdays and bar mitzvahs. Across the country, you'll find the sugary bars for sale at small-town gas stations and supermarkets, where they compete with a class="css-1g7m0tk" href="https://www.presidentschoice.ca/en_CA/products/productlisting/pc-nanaimo-bar-baking-mix.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/22/dining/nanaimo-bars.html

Bane, Jean Hypes - NRVN News

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

After 93 years, four months and five days, Jean Price Hypes Bane has departed this life to go to her final home with the Lord. Born October 19, 1925 in the family home in the Sinking Creek Valley of Craig County, VA, Jean was the only daughter of Laura Beatrice Trenor and James Watson Hypes. She graduated from Maywood High School and then earned a BA degree in Mathematics from Radford State Teachers College and an MEd in Counseling from Radford College. Jean began a life-long career with the school systems. She taught math at Covington High School and Pearisburg High School where the Class of 1960 captured a piece of her heart as a special group of students. She finished the last twenty-four years of her career as a guidance counselor at Giles High School in Pearisburg, VA. She married William Doak Bane, Sr. of Pearisburg, VA on August 14, 1948; they had seventy fulfilling years of marriage. They were blessed with two children and a life-long career together of remodeling the old family home at Cedar Grove...
https://nrvnews.com/bane-jean-hypes/

Becoming a seafarers' chaplain was not exactly his retirement plan - CatholicPhilly.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Deacon Dileep Athaide, a chaplain from the Archdiocese of Vancouver, British Columbia, who ministers to seafarers aboard cargo ships, poses March 15, 2019. (CNS photo/Agnieszka Ruck, The B.C. Catholic) By Agnieszka Ruck • Catholic News Service • Posted March 27, 2019 DELTA, British Columbia (CNS) — A few years ago, Deacon Dileep Athaide could never have guessed he’d become a frequent visitor on the immense coal and container ships dotting the horizon in Delta and Vancouver. Yet nearly every day, he finds himself donning a hard hat, reflective vest and steel-toed boots, chatting with security guards who recognize his white collar and climbing high ladders into cargo ships as a chaplain to seafarers. “It’s only three years that I’ve been doing this, but it feels like 10 years — in a good way,” Deacon Athaide, 69, told The B.C. Catholic, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Vancouver, while on board a Japanese coal carrier at Westshore Terminals...
http://catholicphilly.com/2019/03/news/world-news/becoming-a-seafarers-chaplain-was-not-exactly-his-retirement-plan/

‘Write me soon. Stay safe’: A story of Canada’s opioid crisis, told in letters from prison - The Globe and Mail

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

At her home in Guelph, Ont., Moira Barber lays out one of the letters between her common-law husband, Albert (Manie) Daniels, and Spencer Kell, his old cellmate at Ontario's Maplehurst prison. Tijana Martin/The Globe and Mail When Spencer Kell got out of jail last spring, leaving his cellmate Manie Daniels behind, the two friends started exchanging letters. Mr. Daniels's, written in flowing cursive script, came to Mr. Kell in Ottawa, where he was trying to stay clean and build a new life. Mr. Kell's, in bold block letters, arrived at Maplehurst prison in Milton, Ont., where Mr. Daniels was serving out the final months of his latest stretch behind bars. Their brief correspondence shines a light on the dangers that former prisoners face in the midst of Canada's opioids crisis. Mr. Daniels's full name was Albert Joseph Daniels. His Cree name was Little Buffalo that Runs Against the Herd. His mother and sisters called him Manie – little man – because he was the only boy in the family. Story c...
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-write-me-soon-stay-safe-a-story-of-canadas-opioid-crisis-told-in/

A Celebration Of Life: Bruce Wilkie - PuslinchToday

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

A Celebration Of Life: Bruce Wilkie - March 4, 2019 WILKIE, Bruce Nicholson How (January 19, 1941 ~ February 25, 2019) Survived by his wife Dorothy (nee Gibb) of 53 years and his daughter Carla (Peter) of Squamish. Bruce was born in Perth, Scotland and emigrated to Vancouver in 1955. He graduated from North Vancouver High School in 1958 then attended UBC for two years prior to acceptance into the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario. Bruce graduated in 1965 from the OVC, winning the Winegard medal as the top student. The same year he married Dorothy Ann Gibb, whom he'd met during High School. After a year of clinical practice in Chilliwack, BC, Bruce and Dorothy moved to New York state where Bruce completed his PhD at Cornell University in 1971 in Veterinary Immunopathology. Two years of post-doctoral work in Bern, Switzerland was followed by an appointment to the Ontario Veterinary College in 1973, as professor of Veterinary Immunomicrobiology. Bruce had a distinguished career at t...
https://www.puslinchtoday.ca/2019/03/04/a-celebration-of-life-bruce-wilkie/

Send Funeral Flowers to Whattam Funeral Home

Send beautiful funeral flower arrangements to Whattam Funeral Home for funeral viewing, visitation or burial service. Sympathy flowers is a beautiful and heart-felt way to say good-bye to a cherished friend or loved one. Honor their memory and extend your support to their grieving family with gorgeous flowers.

Sympathy Flowers to Whattam Funeral Home