Sussex NB Funeral Homes

Sussex NB funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Sussex funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Express your deepest sympathy - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Wonderful way to honor the life and memory of a cherished friend or loved one.

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

All white shimmering blossoms symbolize peace, love, and tranquility.

Wallace Funeral Home

34 Sunnyside Dr
Sussex, NB E4E 1C8
(506) 433-1176

Sussex NB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Surviving the death care business - CBC.ca

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

I knew this."Compassion fatigue, unconventional hoursMacDonald, 34, is coming up to her 11th year working with Brenan's. Before that, she spent two years apprenticing at a funeral home in Sussex.Of the 10 people in her 2008 class from the Nova Scotia Community College's program in funeral and allied health services, two are still working in the field.Not many people even stuck with it five years, MacDonald said."Some of it is burnout. You have to make sure with all the stress you deal with on a daily basis you know how to relax yourself, how to unwind."The New Brunswick Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association doesn't keep statistics on retention rates, however, funeral homes are "constantly looking for licensed funeral directors," said executive director Marc Melanson.While the pay can be appealing - $47,319 annually according to the Department of Post Secondary Education Training and Labour - compassion fatigue is a reality, along with unconventional work hours."It's not a Monday to Friday nine-to-five job," said Melanson. "It's evenings, weekends and holidays."People who get into the funeral profession genuinely want to help people. But a funeral home is never closed."Viewing rooms are often rearranged, making physicality a key component of the job. (Sarah Trainor/CBC News)The workday can be fluid and intense. It might start with MacDonald doing prep work on an infant that would afford parents more time with their child, then a full shift in gears to oversee a 103-year-old's celebration of life service in a space filled with laughter."You wear a lot of different hats and it changes so quickly," she said."I could be making funeral arrangements with a family, I could be directing a funeral, I could be painting - like literally building maintenance."We get dirty in our suits. We garden, mow the lawns, wash the cars, we do it all."The job requires a good deal of physicality. Viewing rooms are frequently rearranged to make space for what families want to bring to a visitation. Personal ...
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/sharlene-macdonald-brenans-funeral-director-saint-john-1.5044719

Heroes for a nation: 2 Fredericton police officers honoured at regimental funeral - CBC.ca

Saturday, March 02, 2019

You should know that the Fredericton Police Department is well represented at Robb's favourite Notre Dame University," Morris said. Costello also loved basketball, which he played at Sussex High School, the University of New Brunswick's Saint John campus and the New Brunswick Community College.I am so moved by the number of people out on the streets to view the procession.—@jackiesteeves"His coach in high school mentioned that Costello was not the most skilled player, nor the fastest, or even the most athletic," Morris said."But he was the most selfless. There was nothing he was not going to do for the team." Morris said Costello died doing the job he loved most and helping those around him, and served his community until that "tragic Friday morning.""Robb Costello didn't become a hero as he died. He became a hero as he lived."Members of the Fredericton Police Force place medals, a hat and a ceremonial belt on the casket for Costello at the regimental funeral. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)Morris also spoke about Costello's love for his partner, Jackie McLean, his mother Dolores Costello-Francis, his two children, Kassie and Kaitlyn Costello, and two stepchildren, Katie and Zach Steeves."We will never forget you. You have finished your shift. You are off duty. Take a deep breath - you are home now," Morris said about his friend of 20 years.Throughout the service, the speakers also acknowledged...
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/police-officers-funeral-fredericton-1.4788856

London-area dairy farm worker Carl Gregg remembered as generous family man - London Free Press

Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Carl Gregg, whose workplace death is being probed by Ontario’s Labour Ministry, spent his life on the farm.Born in Sussex, N.B., Gregg grew up on his family’s farm in nearby Mount Pisgah.After moving to Ontario as a young man, he worked a handful agriculture jobs, most recently at Wicketthorn Farms on the outskirts of London.Gregg lived less than a kilometre away from the London-area dairy farm, where he’d worked for the last 16 years.The 58 year old was working alone at the Woodhull Road farm last Tuesday when he fell through an opening into a manure pit, according to Ontario’s Labour Ministry, which is now probing Gregg’s death.Longtime friend Michael Appleton remembers the time he needed to return to New Brunswick to attend his grandmother’s funeral.After asking Gregg for help, Appleton said his friend arrived within an hour ready to make the 1,200-kilometre drive.Gregg visited with family — his two sisters live in New Brunswick — while Appleton spent three days with his grieving relatives.“And then he picked me up and drove me all the way back without even a hesitation,” said Appleton.An avid o...
http://www.lfpress.com/2017/02/27/carl-gregg-farm-worker-who-died-on-job-remembered-for-generosity-to-family-friends

Retired Sergeant Lawrence George Reid - Thompson Citizen

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Hospital.  Larry was born in Salt Springs, NB on June 9, 1929, is the husband of Diana (Bidwell) Reid and a son of the late Stanley and Jean (Ferguson) Reid. He attended the Agricultural school in Sussex and upon graduation Larry worked for the Sussex Cheese and Butter Company, delivering milk to Bloomfield and other local areas, prior to joining the RCMP in 1952. He began his RCMP career in Cape Breton and received the honour of holding the ribbon at the opening of the Canso Causeway in 1955. Later postings took him to Labrador where he met his wife Diana in 1966. Following postings in Newfoundland, Larry then was posted to Thompson in Northern Manitoba. After retiring from the RCMP Larry worked for CMHC and a local real estate company. Larry was appointed as a Magistrate by the Manitoba Government. In 1997 Larry moved back home to New Brunswick to retire. Hobbies over the years include showing his Labrador Retrievers, curling, card playing and owning standard bred race horse mares and foals. Larry is survived by his wife Diana of 50 years; sons Mark (Nicole) of Kamloops, BC, David (Rachael) of Winnipeg, MB; grandchildren Michael, Matthew, Jonathan, Abby, Finley; brother Gordon (Joyce) and sister-in-law Carolyn Banks (Murray); several nieces, nephews and cousins.  Besides his parents, Larry is also predeceased by his infant sister Dorothy and broth...
http://www.thompsoncitizen.net/obituaries/retired-sergeant-lawrence-george-reid-1.7154708

Nipigon native Joseph DeLaronde rescued injured soldiers to earn medal - The Chronicle Journal

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

While recuperating from a bullet wound to his leg, Joe was helped back to health by an 18-year-old nurse named Daisy Sutton of Eastbourne, Sussex. The Times Journal wrote: “Cupid’s arrow sped swiftly from his bow and pierced the heart of Private Joseph DeLaronde, M. M., of Nipigon, who won the love of a winsome English hospital nurse who tenderly waited upon this stalwart young Indian when he lay wounded.” He wooed her with stories of the “vast spaces of Canada, and the sweep of lake, forest and stream,” using “the courtly grace of his French progenitors and the untamed spirit of the Indian race” to sweep her off her feet. They were quickly married in “an ancient English church.” Joe was offered a commission but turned it down, choosing to remain a private. He was one of many DeLarondes to join the army: his cousin Denis, the first member of the 52nd to enter an enemy trench, was killed in June 1916, and Alex was wounded and sent home, but re-enlisted at the first opportunity. Others included Charles who fought with the 141st and Joseph Jr. who was with the 94th. By late 1917, the newspaper could boast that almost 100 men from First Nations in Northwestern Ontario had enlisted. Joe had been a trapper and guide in his early years but became a mail contractor after moving to Port Arthur following the war. He and Daisy had two young children when, in 1929, Joe contracted pneumonia and died after a month-long battle. He was only 35. Members of the 52nd Old Boys’ Association acted as a guard of honor and as pallbearers at his funeral. He was buried at St. Andrew’s cemetery. Looking Back is written weekly by one of various writers for the Thunder Bay Museum. For further information visit the museum at 425 Donald St. E., or view its website at www.thunderbaymuseum.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.chroniclejournal.com/opinion/nipigon-native-joseph-delaronde-rescued-injured-soldiers-to-earn-medal/article_6c91cc56-cb71-11e6-9609-0bc03b0f310c.html

Surviving the death care business - CBC.ca

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

MacDonald said."Some of it is burnout. You have to make sure with all the stress you deal with on a daily basis you know how to relax yourself, how to unwind."The New Brunswick Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association doesn't keep statistics on retention rates, however, funeral homes are "constantly looking for licensed funeral directors," said executive director Marc Melanson.While the pay can be appealing - $47,319 annually according to the Department of Post Secondary Education Training and Labour - compassion fatigue is a reality, along with unconventional work hours."It's not a Monday to Friday nine-to-five job," said Melanson. "It's evenings, weekends and holidays."People who get into the funeral profession genuinely want to help people. But a funeral home is never closed."Viewing rooms are often rearranged, making physicality a key component of the job. (Sarah Trainor/CBC News)The workday can be fluid and intense. It might start with MacDonald doing prep work on an infant that would afford parents more time with their child, then a full shift in gears to oversee a 103-year-old's celebration of life service in a space filled with laughter."You wear a lot of different hats and it changes so quickly," she said."I could be making funeral arrangements with a family, I could be directing a funeral, I could be painting - like literally building maintenance."We get dirty in our suits. We garden, mow the lawns, wash the cars, we do it all."The job requires a good deal of physicality. Viewing rooms are frequently rearranged to make space for what families want to bring to a visitation. Personal touches have been as dainty as jewelry and as grand as a motorcycle.Some scenes hard to processNot everyone is in a bed when they die, and moving a body can take some physical and mental effort."Some things you see you don't ever forget, and you wish you could. Especially when you walk into a scene where you can imagine their last moments."MacDonald said those moments can be difficult to process."It's hard to think of them as being a person in the way that you're protecting your mental state," she said."You say, 'I have to move them from one place to another,' and after, you reflect on that and think, 'OK, that was a human being and I feel terrible for them. And I'm going to probably have bad dreams for a while....
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/sharlene-macdonald-brenans-funeral-director-saint-john-1.5044719

Sanaz Shirshekar Envisions Saint John As 'Playground For Architects To Experiment' - Huddle Today

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

It allowed me to do both." It also allowed her to work at two renowned firms in Canada and the United States and has now brought the Toronto-born architect to New Brunswick to start a business of her own. After graduating from architecture school at McGill in 2006, Shirshekar started working for Toronto-based KPMB as a project architect. There, she got to work on projects such as the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, the UBC Alumni Centre, The Globe & Mail's new interior offices and the Fort York Branch Library. "We were aiming for it to be the 100th public library in Toronto, and it turned out to be the 101st," says Shirshekar, "which is still cool." Fort York Branch Library (Image: torontopubliclibrary.ca) From there she went to work in New York with Yabu Pushelberg as a senior designer. She was in the heart of Soho, working on projects that were more private and high-end, including a resort for Hyatt in Los Cabos, Mexico, and a project for a residential client in Bejing. For Shirshekar, it helped make her architecture experience more versatile. "I took that opportunity on because at KPMB I was getting a lot of those community, public space building projects. But I also wanted to be a little bit more seasoned as an architect and get some architectural interior experience," she says. "Yabu Pushelberg is really the expert for that. They are world renowned. They're really good at what they do and they're internationally known for their interior design excellence, so I really wanted to bring the architecture and the interior design together." Shirshekar recently moved to New Brunswick to be with her husband, Jamie Irving, the vice-president of Brunswick News. At that point, she was ready to start her own practice, Studio Shirshekar. "I feel all architects at some point, you feel like you've gotten enough experience and you want to give yourself an opportunity to try it out," she says. "Maybe it's not for everyone, but for me, I think i...
https://huddle.today/sanaz-shirshekar-envisions-saint-john-as-a-playground-for-architects-to-experiment/

Saskatchewan police officers attend regimental funeral - Global News Regina

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Saskatoon Police Service, two from Moose Jaw, and one from Weyburn are representing the south of the province.Three Regina Police Service members who attended are originally from New Brunswick, including one from Fredericton. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://globalnews.ca/news/4395856/saskatchewan-police-officers-attend-regimental-funeral/