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Salons funéraires Maher Funeral Home

421 Rue Victoria Street
Dalhousie, NB E8C 2V2
(506) 684-2390

Dalhousie NB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Cape Breton politician known for his ties to Strait area - Cape Breton Post

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Doucet, 80, died Thursday in Halifax. Born in Grand Étang in 1937, he graduated from St. Francis Xavier University and went on to earn a law degree from Dalhousie University in 1961. He was first elected as the member for Richmond to the Nova Scotia Legislature when he was 26 years old and he became a cabinet minister nine months later. He was the first Acadian cabinet minister in the province’s history. He served as the minister of education, minister of youth, provincial secretary and minister of emergency measures.He owned CIGO in Port Hawkesbury between 1975 and 1985 and that’s where present station president Bob MacEachern first met him.“I was an employee of his company for about six years,” said MacEachern on Friday. “I didn’t work closely with him — I got to know him after that.”MacEachern said Doucet may have left Cape Breton to work as a lawyer in Halifax and as a consultant in Ottawa but the Strait area was never far from his mind.“He was always very much connected to the Strait region and what was going on.”Doucet is survived by his wife, Vida, five children, 13 grandchildren and four brothers. Snow’s Funeral Home in Halifax will announce the funeral information once it is known.news@cbpost.comLet's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.capebretonpost.com/news/local/cape-breton-politician-known-for-his-ties-to-strait-area-164853/

'Wade had his own style': Community remembers Halifax principal who died after cancer battle - Globalnews.ca

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Mantley had coached with Smith one year when he was at St. Patrick’s High School, played against him when he attended Dalhousie and Smith was at St. FX, and had recently been coaching with him as part of Basketball Nova Scotia.He told Global News that the U-17 team had practice on the weekend following Smith’s death and during that practice people were putting flowers, cards and candles in front of Citadel.Our sincere condolences go out to Principal Wade Smith's family, friends, colleagues & students today. He will be deeply missed #wadestrong— NS Education (@nseducation) June 5, 2017Practice had a “sombre mood,” he said, but that the players kept “plugging through”.“They realized that Wade would want us to do that even though he’s not with us at this present moment, but he is looking down upon us and coaching from above,” Mantley said.Hudson said she’d remember him for how people followed him and how he treated them.“Wade had his own style,” she said. “He was just his own person and remember, he’s a coach, so he coached basketball, so he had a lot of people who followed him because of basketball but he also made an impact in terms of what he wanted to see happen within the education system.”She said she believes he wanted to reach out and get other people to understand the issues that exist within society, especially in Nova Scotia, and the difference that can be made.“I would see him as being a warrior, a very strong individual with a strong personality, but very kind-hearted in terms of the impact he wanted to make for all learners and students,” Hudson said.In Smith’s obituary on Dignity Memorial.com, which was something he wanted to write himself but “time didn’t permit” and so instead was “told by my brother Craig”, it pays tribute to his family.“It is readily apparent that Wade accomplished more than most on and off the basketball court, but his most accomplished and trusted assets were with his devoted wife Sherry and his two incredibly talented, loving, and well equipped for life sons Jaydan and Jaxon,” the obituary reads.“The three of them were the centre-piece of his life and most notably, his most accomplished acts in his life.”In the obituary, it asks that instead of flowers Smith “would suggest you spend time with your children and loved ones, toast your great friendships, keep things simple, keep things smooth, and keep things moving.”Donations can be made to the Wade Smith Memorial Scholarship Fund or Education Fund for Jaydan and Jaxon via Scotiabank.An open visitation will take place Wednesday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., and 6-8 p.m. at Snows Funeral Home on Lacewood Drive. A celebration of life will take place Thursday at 1 p.m. at the Emmanuel Baptist Church on Pockwock Road in Upper Hammonds Plains.—With files from Jennifer Grudic, Global NewsLet's block ads! (Why?)...
http://globalnews.ca/news/3503395/wade-had-his-own-style-community-remembers-halifax-principal-who-died-after-cancer-battle/

SMU's McBride made future leaders - TheChronicleHerald.ca

Friday, June 2, 2017

By 1967, he was teaching at Saint Mary’s, where he remained with the faculty until his retirement in 1994. During his career he also taught for four years with Dalhousie Law School, according to an interview he gave in 1993. In 2012, SMU awarded Prof. McBride an honorary doctorate of civil law, and the good professor became Dr. McBride. The essence of McBride’s lessons were those places where “the restless dynamics of politics and the black letter of the law” would collide.He taught students the American constitution using baseball analogies — sections of the document explained in innings and players on base.Canadian federalism and jurisprudence was taught by comparison, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms was a primary interest and focus of his study, writing and teaching. He would get students to prepare for mock trials based on fabricated constitutional scenarios to test the application of the Charter, still in its infancy after it was adopted in 1982. His lectures sparked reasoned debate about events in Canadian law and politics that happened, or almost happened, before their time. McBride deeply inspired those he taught by leaving lasting impressions, not solely about law and politics, but about themselves, their sense of duty, and to develop what he called their “imaginative intellect”. It’s no surprise that in 1987, 10 years before his retirement, he received the SMU’s William A. Stewart Medal for Excellence in Teaching.But what he really cherished were the stories and accomplishments of his students long after they left the poli-sci wing of the Loyola building.Professor McBride was fiercely proud of those who would go off to become tomorrow’s leaders: lawyers, judges, politicians, administrators and journalists.One of his former students is provincial cabinet minister Lena Diab, who tabled a resolution in the House of Assembly on the occasion of his 80th birthday in March 2014.“He had a way of helping you see your own potential, and when I saw him after my 2013 election, he was so happy and told me he always knew I would get somewhere,” she said in an interview days after her re-election. “He was so proud of all his students.”Diab said McBride’s influence on her and others was as unique to them as as his with JFK was to him, and part of what motivates her to s...
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1474569-smu%25E2%2580%2599s-mcbride-made-future-leaders

The Five Fishermen: Halifax Eatery Serves Up Fine Seafood and the Odd Apparition - Huddle Today

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Canada, opened in 1818 to boys and girls with a focus on educating the poor in religion and moral duties.The school soon outgrew the four-floor building in the heart of the city and moved to Dalhousie College.The Argyle Street building was taken over by writer and educator Anna Leonowens of “The King and I” fame, who started an art school.The Victoria School of Art and Design, a precursor to the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, boasted eminent teachers including Group of Seven painter Arthur Lismer.It’s in the early 20th century that the building’s plot thickens.Snow & Company Undertaker, the city’s first mortuary, moved into the clapboard-and-stone building after the art school relocated.The company, which would go on to become J.A. Snow Funeral Home and survive to this day, played a critical role in two disasters.The first, on April 15, 1912, was the sinking of the Titanic 640 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland.Rescue operations took place out of Halifax, the nearest mainland port. John Snow boarded the cable repair ship Mackay-Bennett, taking with him 125 coffins, embalming fluid and iron to weigh down bodies buried at sea. The wealthier victims were brought back to the mortuary on Argyle Street.The second disaster was the Halifax explosion on Dec. 6, 1917.The windows of the Argyle Street building shattered in the blast, but the funeral parlour remained open.Snow & Company conducted funeral services for roughly 2,000 victims at a rate of 30 to 40 a day.“There were caskets stacked up outside the building like cord wood,” Fraser said. “It was after those disasters that the stories of ghosts and hauntings started.”The restaurant’s many eerie encounters have attracted paranormal investigators and ghost hunters from far and wide.“Things happen in this building,” Fraser said. “I’ve not only heard stories. I’ve been witness to some of the strange things that happen here.”After one busy night at the restaurant, Fraser was alone in the upstairs offices.“It was sometime after 2 a.m. and there was a sort of knocking on a repetitive basis but out of sync,” he said. “I searched for it but couldn’t find the source.”While most of the ghostly encounters have happened with staff, patrons have experienced the paranormal as well.“The story that really tickled me is when we had a family of 10 from Manitoba,” Fraser said. “They didn’t seem to know anything about the history of our building.”On her way downstairs from the third-floor washroom, a girl aged about 12 described seeing a young female draped in clothing and drifting over the staircase.“She ran to her mother, and the mother called over the waitress, who brought me over,” he said. “I listened to the story, and the girl described quite accurately a ghost that others have seen.“We have a long chain of hauntings and stories,” Fraser added.“This was a funeral home during two horrendous events — the Halifax explosion and the Titanic. I suppose maybe there are spirits still here.”___Brett Bundale, The Canadian PressThe Canadian Press, 2016Let's block ads! (Why?)...

Dining with ghosts? Halifax restaurant once... - Canoe

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Canada, opened in 1818 to boys and girls with a focus on educating the poor in religion and moral duties.The school soon outgrew the four-floor building in the heart of the city and moved to Dalhousie College.The Argyle Street building was taken over by writer and educator Anna Leonowens of “The King and I” fame, who started an art school.The Victoria School of Art and Design, a precursor to the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, boasted eminent teachers including Group of Seven painter Arthur Lismer.It’s in the early 20th century that the building’s plot thickens.Snow & Company Undertaker, the city’s first mortuary, moved into the clapboard-and-stone building after the art school relocated.The company, which would go on to become J.A. Snow Funeral Home and survive to this day, played a critical role in two disasters.The first, on April 15, 1912, was the sinking of the Titanic 640 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland.Rescue operations took place out of Halifax, the nearest mainland port. John Snow boarded the cable repair ship Mackay-Bennett, taking with him 125 coffins, embalming fluid and iron to weigh down bodies buried at sea. The wealthier victims were brought back to the mortuary on Argyle Street.The second disaster was the Halifax explosion on Dec. 6, 1917.The windows of the Argyle Street building shattered in the blast, but the funeral parlour remained open.Snow & Company conducted funeral services for roughly 2,000 victims at a rate of 30 to 40 a day.“There were caskets stacked up outside the building like cord wood,” Fraser said. “It was after those disasters that the stories of ghosts and hauntings started.”The restaurant’s many eerie encounters have attracted paranormal investigators and ghost hunters from far and wide.“Things happen in this building,” Fraser said. “I’ve not only heard stories. I’ve been witness to some of the strange things that happen here.”After one busy night at the restaurant, Fraser was alone in the upstairs offices.“It was sometime after 2 a.m. and there was a sort of knocking on a repetitive basis but out of sync,” he said. “I searched for it but couldn’t find the source.”While most of the ghostly encounters have happened with staff, patrons have experienced the paranormal as well.“The story that really tickled me is when we had a family of 10 from Manitoba,” Fraser said. “They didn’t seem to know anything about the history of our building.”On her way downstairs from the third-floor washroom, a girl aged about 12 described seeing a young female draped in clothing and drifting over the staircase.“She ran to her mother, and the mother called over the waitress, who brought me over,” he said. “I listened to the story, and the girl described quite accurately a ghost that others have seen.“We have a long chain of hauntings and stories,” Fraser added.“This was a funeral home during two horrendous events — the Halifax explosion and the Titanic. I suppose maybe there are spirits still here.”———If You Go...The Five Fishermen restaurant is located across the street from Grand Parade, a square in downtown Halifax featuring the historic City Hall, and between the Halifax Harbou...
http://www.canoe.com/Travel/Canada/2017/05/09/22723205.html

Oscar Maillet - Hartford Courant

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Oscar Maillet 91 of Avon and Bouctouche New Brunswick Canada died at home with his loving family by his side on Saturday March 31 2018. He was born December 9 1926 and raised in St. Maurice N.B. Canada. He was the son of the late Firmin and Elise (Cormier) Maillet. Oscar married the former Ida Poirier on September 14 1948 in Dieppe N.B. Canada and relocated to Hartford in 1949. They moved to Avon in 1955. Oscar was a builder and developed Birch Ridge and Maillet Lane in New Hartford and built homes in the Avon Canton and Simsbury area until 1982 when an accident ended his career. Oscar was a communicant of St. Ann Church in Avon. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus Pius XII Council 4376 and past Grand Knight. Oscar attended many retreats at the lmmaculata Retreat House in Willimantic and the Holy Family Retreat House in Farmington. He was a member of LaRencontre belonged to the Avon Senior Center and was a member of the United Ostomy Association. Oscar enjoyed spending his summers in Bouctouche N.B. Canada and fishing...
http://www.courant.com/obituaries/hc-obituary-oscar-maillet-20180403-story.html

Do-it-yourself casket kit adds life to New Brunswick woodworker's business - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A New Brunswick woodworker has designed a “do-it-yourself” casket kit to alleviate funeral costs.Woodworker Jeremy Burrill of Fredericton says he is a no-nonsense kind of guy, which is likely why his business mantra sounds like it was taken straight from an old-fashioned country song. “Just bury me in a pine box,” said Burrill, who owns the Fiddlehead Casket Co.Story continues belowREAD MORE: Woman pulls casket for miles for mental health awarenessBurrill said he wanted to give people a simpler, cheaper and more environmentally friendly option for their end of life send offs.  He started handcrafting old-fashioned pine box coffins from his workshop in Fredericton, kind of like the ones used in the old west.“They are fastened with wooden dowels so there are no screws and no metal or anything in it,” Burrill said.The caskets sell for roughly $700 and even the bed lining is made of wood shavings. So so every part of the coffin is biodegradable. Over time,...

Brothers in arms: Ron and Ryan Anderson both survived tours in Afghanistan — but not PTSD - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Maureen and Peter Anderson)Ron and Ryan Anderson were built for war.The brothers grew up in a military family, moving around the globe before settling near New Brunswick's Canadian Forces Base Gagetown. Their father, Peter, was a sergeant major.There was never any doubt that Ron and Ryan would follow in their father's footsteps. They grew up playing "army" and following their dad to work.Both enlisted as soon as they finished Grade 10. Their parents couldn't have been more proud."I figured it was a good life," Maureen said.Ron and Ryan quickly racked up tours in conflict zones: places like Croatia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Eritrea and, finally, Afghanistan. Ryan Anderson, in the middle, is pictured during his tour to Afghanistan. Years later, he'd spend hours telling his mother stories about his time fighting in the war.(Maureen and Peter Anderson)They were well-trained, reliable soldiers and the medals piled up. During his first tour in Afghanistan, Ron, the eldest, received a commendation for treating an injured Afghan child in the middle of a hostile crowd.Ron didn't hesitate when he was asked to deploy to Afghanistan a second time, his fifth tour in a combat zone.It was what he was trained to do.A mother's intuitionMaureen didn't want Ron to go back. He wasn't the same after coming home from the country the first time. Didn't he have enough tours under his belt?"I really didn't want him to go," she said. "I just had a bad feeling."The Andersons — Ron, Ryan, Peter and Maureen — smile on Ryan's wedding day. Maureen worried about her sons going to Afghanistan.(Maria Jose Burgos/CBC)But she didn't say anything. Ron was looking forward to being deployed.And it would be Ryan's first tour in Afghanistan. Ron was going to keep an eye on his younger brother.They didn't know the carnage that awaited them.On Easter Sunday in 2007, six Canadian soldiers were killed in a roadside bombing west of Kandahar City.Five of the six men were from the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment at tight-knit CFB Gagetown, where the Anderson brothers were posted. They included Sgt. Donnie Lucas, one of Ron's close friends."It was the first men to be killed in our unit in a very long time," said Blair Williams, who was also in Afghanistan at the time.After the blast, Ryan was dispatched to the site, a job that may have seen him picking up his friends' remains.Days later, Ryan travelled in the light armoured vehicle carrying Lucas's casket in the ramp ceremony, held before a soldier's body is sent home.Soldiers carry a casket during a ramp ceremony for six soldiers killed in a blast on Easter Sunday in 2007. Many of the victims were Ron and Ryan Anderson's friends.(CBC)The scenes from that ceremony stuck with Ryan, according to Williams."It touched his heart. Another friend that's not going to get to go home."A harrowing weekTwo months later, on June 13, 2007, Ron was in the Afghan desert when his heart started pounding. He was sweating heavily and his body was vibrating.Ron went to the medic, and the doctor knew exactly what was happening. It was the soldier's first panic attack, and the first sign that something was very wrong."It was just after my buddies got blown up," a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-b...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/anderson-brothers-ptsd-1.4589733