Surrey BC Funeral Homes

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Avalon Surrey Funeral Home

13288-108 Avenue
Surrey, BC V3T 2J6
(604) 581-4401

First Memorial Funeral Services - Fraser Heights Chapel

14835 Fraser Hwy.
Surrey, BC V3R 3N6
(604) 389-2559

Good Shepard Church

2250 - 150th Street Surrey
Surrey, BC V4A 9J3
(604) 531-5739

Gracepoint Community Church

3487 King George Hwy,
Surrey, BC V4P 1B7
(604) 538-1825

Surrey Cemetery

16671 Old Mclellan Rd
Surrey, BC V3S 1H8

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

15450 20 Avenue
Surrey, BC V4A 2A5
(604) 531-5911

VALEY VIEW FUNERAL HOME CHAPEL

14660-72nd Ave
Surrey, BC V3S 2E7
(604) 596-8866

Victory Memorial Park Funeral Centre

14831 28 Ave
Surrey, BC V4P 1P3
(604) 536-6522

Zion Lutheran Church

5950 179th Street
Surrey, BC V3S 4J9
(604) 576-1394

Surrey BC Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Edmonton mourns Humboldt Broncos lost in crash, while rooting for those still in hospital - Toronto Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

NHL player Chris Joseph, was killed in the crash.The Edmonton native was “the guy that would gel the team,” lightening up the locker room mood with one-liners, said friend and former Surrey Eagles teammate Jeff Stewart, who played with Joseph on the Eagles during the 2015-2016 season.“He always had a smile on his face when he walked through the doors,” said Stewart, who remembers pre-practice pool tournaments with Joseph at his billet family’s home.Aerial footage shows the site of a bus crash near Tisdale, Saskatchewan, involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team. The crash killed 15 people. (The Canadian Press) Joseph was “never the fastest guy on the ice but he could definitely shoot the puck and he always knew his positioning super well,” Stewart said. The twenty-year-old was such a team player that Stewart credits him with helping him get a hockey scholarship.St. Albert’s Stephen Wack was remembered by friends as a towering 6 foot 5 inch defenceman who was also a talented videographer. He hoped to turn his eye for capturing the moment into a post-hockey career.“He honestly should have had his IQ tested, I mean he was a straight A-plus student. The guy had the world by the tail,” family friend Scott Held told StarMetro over the weekend. “His videos, they are outstanding.”Wack always looked out for his little brother, who was born blind, Held said, and made sure that Held’s son, who was five years younger, felt included and looked after.“It sounds cliché, but it couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. Just a genuinely awesome human being.”Connor Lukan, a Broncos forward from Slave Lake, played with the midget St. Albert Raiders and Spruce Grove Saints in the Alberta Junior Hockey League before the Broncos.Tyson Chizma wrote on Twitter Lukan was “one of the best hockey players and an even greater guy off the ice.”Lukan’s former Spruce Grove Saints teammate Logan Hunter, from St. Albert, was also killed, as was Parker Tobin, from Stony Plain. Hunter was described as someone who “always had a smile on his face” by St. Albert Raiders president Kevin Porte...

Edmonton mourns Humboldt Broncos lost in crash, while rooting for ... - Toronto Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

NHL player Chris Joseph, was killed in the crash.The Edmonton native was “the guy that would gel the team,” lightening up the locker room mood with one-liners, said friend and former Surrey Eagles teammate Jeff Stewart, who played with Joseph on the Eagles during the 2015-2016 season.“He always had a smile on his face when he walked through the doors,” said Stewart, who remembers pre-practice pool tournaments with Joseph at his billet family’s home.Aerial footage shows the site of a bus crash near Tisdale, Saskatchewan, involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team. The crash killed 15 people. (The Canadian Press) Joseph was “never the fastest guy on the ice but he could definitely shoot the puck and he always knew his positioning super well,” Stewart said. The twenty-year-old was such a team player that Stewart credits him with helping him get a hockey scholarship.St. Albert’s Stephen Wack was remembered by friends as a towering 6 foot 5 inch defenceman who was also a talented videographer. He hoped to turn his eye for capturing the moment into a post-hockey career.“He honestly should have had his IQ tested, I mean he was a straight A-plus student. The guy had the world by the tail,” family friend Scott Held told StarMetro over the weekend. “His videos, they are outstanding.”Wack always looked out for his little brother, who was born blind, Held said, and made sure that Held’s son, who was five years younger, felt included and looked after.“It sounds cliché, but it couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. Just a genuinely awesome human being.”Connor Lukan, a Broncos forward from Slave Lake, played with the midget St. Albert Raiders and Spruce Grove Saints in the Alberta Junior Hockey League before the Broncos.Tyson Chizma wrote on Twitter Lukan was “one of the best hockey players and an even greater guy off the ice.”Lukan’s former Spruce Grove Saints teammate Logan Hunter, from St. Albert, was also killed, as was Parker Tobin, from Stony Plain. Hunter was described as someone who “always had a smile on his face” by St. Albert Raiders president Kevin Porte...

Vancouver woman, 26, dies after consuming pill cut with cocaine and fentanyl - Pentiction Western News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Coast. He said she loved Ucluelet and learned how to surf out here.“We miss her so much,” he said. “The whole family is crying. There were 300 [First Nations] at the funeral in Surrey.”Dickie said it wasn’t until recently that Samantha started taking drugs.“I think she got into some people that were doing it. I mean, she wasn’t an addict. She hated the stuff because of what it did to her mother.”Constable Jarett Duncan of the Ucluelet RCMP reiterates the fact that you could lose your life if you take recreational drugs.“At the end of the day you have no idea what’s been put in that. You have no idea how its been made, you don’t know where it’s been made and ultimately there too many cases of people throughout B.C. and Canada wide who have been dying due to fentanyl. I think it’s very tragic and this is something that is preventable if people decide not to use these recreational drugs,” said Duncan.According to a news released published by the BC Coroners Service on Jan. 31, 2018, approximately 81 per cent of the suspected illicit drug deaths to date in 2017 had fentanyl detected, up from 67 per cent in 2016. In most cases, fentanyl was combined with other illicit drugs, most often cocaine, heroin or methamphetamines.“As the coroners’ data show all too clearly, we are still in the midst of a persistent and continuing epidemic of unintentional poisoning deaths,” said provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall in the news release.In 2017, there were 1,422 suspected drug overdose deaths, according to the data gathered by the BC Coroners Service. This is a 43 per cent increase from the number of overdose deaths in 2016 (993). The number of illicit drug overdose deaths in 2017 equates to about 3.9 deaths per day for the year.“Through heroic and unprecedented actions, responders on the front lines are daily saving hundreds of lives. But hundreds more are still dying, most often alone and with no one nearby to act when things go wrong. We are going to need to think more broadly, and further out of our comfort zone, to end these tragic losses,” said Dr. Perry Kendall.Dickie hopes his message is heard loud and clear.“For people...

How to build a life after your daughter is murdered - Technical.ly Brooklyn

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Teagan. The manner in which Teagan died is not publicly known, and in fact Gabe Batstone says he doesn’t know himself. What is known is that Lisa Batstone crashed her car into a ditch in Surrey, British Columbia. She knocked on the door of a nearby house and asked them to call the police, saying, according to reports, that her “baby was dead.”Lisa Batstone was arrested and eventually charged with second-degree murder of the couple’s daughter, but the trial has faced numerous delays, and in fact has not even begun yet, more than three years after the incident. According to a recent tweet from Batstone’s advocacy org, the trial could begin later this year.Lisa and Gabe Batstone met each other in their late 20s through mutual friends and married in their early 30s. They had their first and only child, Teagan, in 2006. Two years later, the couple separated and divorced. Lisa and Teagan Batstone continued to live in Vancouver, while Gabe lived in Ottawa. Teagan would come to Ottawa during school breaks and for the summers. Gabe remarried after a few years and now has a toddler with his new wife and a stepson from his wife’s previous marriage.I asked Gabe if he thought his ex-wife Lisa was mentally ill. He responded that given that he will be a witness in the trial, he didn’t want to answer that, but noted that she’d been ruled mentally fit to stand trial. Still, 18 months before Teagan’s murder, in 2012, Lisa Batstone had been admitted to a hospital due to a suicide attempt. Gabe Batstone was able to win custody of Teagen for the duration of his ex-wife’s stay in the hospital, but shortly after she was released, the state ruled that Teagan belonged back with her mother, much to Gabe Batstone’s protestations.“It was one of those inflection points,” Gabe Batstone said of the court’s decision. “There are some things you look back at but there are some things you knew are wrong at the time. We treat children who go through a process like this like a piece of property. There’s a mother and a father and they fight over the property. It treats them like a couch: ‘Who gets the couch?'”From the more recent pictures before Teagan’s killing this is one of my favourites. She always like to visit my offices so we spent a few hours in downtown Ottawa.In theory the trial is now 5 months away and we can hope for justice, accountability and safety. #TeaganPhotoFridaypic.twitter.com/plLrX8KHyb— Teagan's Voice (@Teagans_Voice) March 31, 2018“After an event like this, you’re essentially nonfunctional for some time,” Batstone explained. “But actually you have a lot to do. Like planning a funeral. What size casket do we need? And this was at a time where I didn’t even, like, know how to eat. People asked, ‘How were you able to navigate that?’ and I said ‘Teagan’s voice.’ Would you allow the parents of the woman that murdered your daughter to the funeral?” He did. “Yeah, and not cause I wanted them there but because Teagan would have.”Batstone calls that Part 1.“Part 2 was that as you get through that, and at the time...

'Everyone deserves something': provincially-funded funerals on the rise - CBC.ca

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Under a green tent at the Surrey Centre Cemetery, sit four empty chairs."We set up a full service just in case a relative or loved one comes by," said groundskeeper Daniel Sward.Last Wednesday morning, no one showed up for a burial. They rarely do in such cases.Sward begins to bury the ashes of Ricky G. McKersie. All he knows of the man is his name and that he was 60 when he died in March 2016."You take care. Rest peacefully, sir," he whispers, as he lowers the urn into the square-shaped hole at the cemetery grounds.Groundskeeper Daniel Sward says a few words in the absence of family and loved ones. (Tina Lovgreen/CBC)"I feel like everyone deserves something. Maybe a few words, that's the least I can do," said Sward.It makes me feel better, hopefully he sees that somewhere."McKersie's burial last week was one of 2,403 funerals the province paid for in 2016 because no one else could or would. Publicly-paid burials were once referred to as pauper's funer...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/multimedia/everyone-deserves-something-provincially-funded-funerals-on-the-rise-1.4420452

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A doctor who spent decades working to improve health care in northern British Columbia is being mourned after he died Tuesday night.Dr. Bert Kelly was a "tireless champion for health care" said Prince George city councillor Susan Scott, who announced his passing via Facebook.Kelly was a key architect of the Northern Medical Program, in which students in UBC's medical program are trained in northern B.C. in an effort to help recruit and retain future medical professionals in a region that historically has been underserved.Faced with chronic doctor shortages in Prince George and the surrounding area, Kelly helped lead a local group of physicians and specialists in what was effectively a strike in 2000, withdrawing non-essential services until the province agreed to commit more funding and efforts to recruitment and retention of doctors in the north. By 2004 the Northern Medical Program was opened, with Kelly serving the role of Executive Director of the Northern Medical Society.Truly sad this morning at the loss of Dr. Bert Kelly! He wa...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

Audrey Ann 'Penny' Cline - The Altamont Enterprise

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Utica; by their four daughters, Mrs. Wendy J. Hotaling of Northville, Mrs. Laurel A. St. Onge of Northville, Mrs. Erika L. Troxell of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Amy E. Cline of Kamloops, British Columbia; by her two brothers, Paul T. Burnett of Donna, Texas and Clark W. Burnett of Citrus Springs, Florida; and by her 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.A graveside service will be held at a time to be announced in the spring in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Northville. Condolences may be made to the family online at www.northvillefuneralservice.com.Memorial contributions may be made to local hospice agencies.Let's block ads! (Why?)...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506