Mission BC Funeral Homes

Mission BC funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Mission funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Bakerview Celebration Centre

34863 Cemetery Ave
Mission, BC V2V 6Y6
(604) 820-8844

Northside Community Church

33507 Dewdney Trunk Rd
Mission, BC V2V 6Y3
(604) 826-3299

ST JOSEPH'S PARISH

32550 Seventh Avenue
Mission, BC V2V 2B9
(604) 826-2452

Woodlawn Mission Funeral Home

7386 Horne St,
Mission, BC V2V 3Y7
(604) 826-9548

Mission BC Obituaries and Funeral Related News

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Cornwall and Area Death Notices - Cornwall Seaway News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Air Force at the start of the cold war, serving from 1951 to 1987, as a jetfighter pilot. During flight training he was the recipient of the JD Siddley trophy for best performance, receiving his commission as a Pilot Officer in the RCAF in 1952. He served two tours in Germany, initially flying CF-86 sabres with 434 Squadron in Zweibrucken from 1953-54 and then returning to command 441 and 439 Squadrons flying CF-104 starfighters in Lahr and Baden-Sollingen from 1969-72. After his first tour overseas he married his high-school sweetheart and lifelong love, Faith Marie Mill, in December 1954. Returning to Canada from Europe in 1954 he served in the Overseas Ferry Unit, flying small single-engined fighters across the Atlantic to Europe from Longeueil, Quebec. Postings through the late 50s and early 60s saw him training the RCAF’s (and NATO’s) growing cadre of pilots in Portage la Prairie, Saskatoon and Gimli. His experience with accident investigation within the Flight Safety Directorate in Ottawa from 1965-68 helped initiate safety procedures that dramatically brought down the accident rate amongst new jet pilots. After a year’s study in Staff College in Kingston and operational training in Chatham and Cold Lake, Bruce Burgess returned to Europe, commanding 441 and 439 reconnaissance squadrons flying CF-104s in Germany and studying with the Royal Air Force Warfare College at RAF Manby in 1972. Returning to the Air Requirements Directorate in Ottawa from 1973-77, he helped shepherd the acquisition of the next generation of CF-18 (hornet) fighter aircraft. Highlights of his later career include Base Commander at CFB Comox (1977-80), Defense Attache in London (1980-82), Chief of Staff Air Force Operations, Winnipeg (1982-84) and Deputy Chief of Staff of Operations at Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs (1984-87). He was awarded the Order of Military Merit in 1984, supplementing his earlier Special Service Medal (NATO-OTAN) and Canadian Decoration. He retired with Faith to Lancaster, Ontario in 1987. Bruce Burges...
http://www.cornwallseawaynews.com/community/2018/3/5/cornwall-and-area-death-notices.html

Couple awarded $8 million after daughter's body vanishes from funeral home - KPTV.com

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A Texas jury has awarded $8 million to a San Antonio couple after their daughter’s body disappeared from a funeral home more than two years ago.Sharlotte and Timothy Mott filed a lawsuit against Mission Park Funeral Chapels and Cemeteries, alleging gross negligence.On Aug. 8, 2015, the couple held a funeral for their 25-year-old daughter, Julie Mott, who died after a lifelong battle with cystic fibrosis. She was to be cremated after the memorial service, but the next day employees discovered her body missing from a damaged casket at the funeral home.Alex Katzman, one of the lawyers representing the Mott family, argued that Mission Park had inadequate security and its employees lacked proper training. “They failed miserably,” Katzman said during closing arguments on Tuesday. “They broke their promise to provide care, control and custody of Julie Mott’s body.”Rick Reyna, the lead attorney for Mission Park, said the body was stolen and it “was something the funeral home could never have anticipated.”Reyna said that "Bill Wilburn (Mott's ex-boyfriend) stole the body" because he "obsessed by Julie and opposed to cremation."Wilburn was questioned by police as a person of interest but has not been char...
http://www.kptv.com/story/37502826/couple-awarded-8-million-after-daughters-body-vanishes-from-funeral-home

Appeal ends, nearly $6000 raised - Sault Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

My whole world in (one) picture,” she wrote of her son in a Facebook post in September 2016 when he celebrated his first birthday. Chamberlain, who also went to White Pines, apprenticed at Mr. Transmission and was a cook at Burger Don. btkelly@postmedia.comOn Twitter: @Saultreporter  Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.saultstar.com/2018/02/11/funeral-cost-appeal-tops-goal

Business Buzz: April 10 - The London Free Press

Thursday, April 12, 2018

The four categories are Innovation, Leadership, Impact and CollaborationNomination guidelines are available online at Pillar Nonprofit Network’s website, pillarnonprofit.ca. The deadline for submissions is May 31. Nominations are reviewed by an external selections committee and 12 finalists will be selected and profiled leading up to the event. The awards ceremony will take place on November 22 at the London Convention Centre.Award recipients will receive $2,000 to be directed to the registered charity of their choice and have their names engraved on a plaque in the Hudson’s Bay Passageway at the London Central Library. EOA Sasquatch. (File photo)Tree Trunk TourThe highly popular Tree Trunk Tour has earned the Hamilton Road Area Business Assoc. a provincial award.The Hamilton Road will receive a Special Achievement award for Streetscaping and Public Realm Improvements from the Ontario Business Improvement Area Association.The neighbourhood’s collection of 21 intricately carved tree trunks has rapidly become a tourist attraction in the ethnically diverse, working-class neighbourhood, even attracting out-of-town bus tours.The award will be presented at the national conference of Business Improvement Areas to be held at Blue Mountain resort in Collingwood on April 16.Hamilton Road association President Rick Pinheiro and member Dave Broostad will also be asked to speak at the conference plenaries on how the Tree Trunk Tour evolved.Two new tree trunk sculptures will join the collection this year, including one at Evan’s Funeral Home.Skeeter controlIf the weather ever warms up, London area backyards will be invaded by the annual swarm of mosquitoes and ticks.But a new London company is ready to take them on.Trevor Davis, a Western University science and business graduate has founded a new pe...
http://lfpress.com/business/local-business/business-buzz-april-10

Audrey Ann 'Penny' Cline - The Altamont Enterprise

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Utica; by their four daughters, Mrs. Wendy J. Hotaling of Northville, Mrs. Laurel A. St. Onge of Northville, Mrs. Erika L. Troxell of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Amy E. Cline of Kamloops, British Columbia; by her two brothers, Paul T. Burnett of Donna, Texas and Clark W. Burnett of Citrus Springs, Florida; and by her 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.A graveside service will be held at a time to be announced in the spring in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Northville. Condolences may be made to the family online at www.northvillefuneralservice.com.Memorial contributions may be made to local hospice agencies.Let's block ads! (Why?)...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A doctor who spent decades working to improve health care in northern British Columbia is being mourned after he died Tuesday night.Dr. Bert Kelly was a "tireless champion for health care" said Prince George city councillor Susan Scott, who announced his passing via Facebook.Kelly was a key architect of the Northern Medical Program, in which students in UBC's medical program are trained in northern B.C. in an effort to help recruit and retain future medical professionals in a region that historically has been underserved.Faced with chronic doctor shortages in Prince George and the surrounding area, Kelly helped lead a local group of physicians and specialists in what was effectively a strike in 2000, withdrawing non-essential services until the province agreed to commit more funding and efforts to recruitment and retention of doctors in the north. By 2004 the Northern Medical Program was opened, with Kelly serving the role of Executive Director of the Northern Medical Society.Truly sad this morning at the loss of Dr. Bert Kelly! He wa...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039