Metchosin BC Funeral Homes

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St. Mary's Cemetery

4354 Metchosin Rd.
Metchosin, BC V9C 3Z4
(250) 474-4119

Metchosin BC Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Two Carnival Legends Lost - VenuesNow

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Laura Hibbs shared that Bingo died at the first spot he ever played with his carnival, Port Alberni. But not until after the show closed. Almost 900 people attended his memorial in Langley, British Columbia. Ron Burback, Funtastic Shows was among them. "If you had him for a friend, you were ahead of the game," Burback said. Retired carnival owner Claire Morton from Alaska remembered when son Bobby hired a driver for Bingo because his hands were arthritic and he couldn't handle the big rig. Off they go and when the driver pulls into a truck stop for a cup of coffee, Bingo drove off and left him. Jackie recalled when they met. She was working on a carnival in her parent's candy floss and popcorn wagon. "They didn't want me in the business," she said. But she met Bingo, and the rest is history. In his youth, Bingo was in a hurry to get out of Brandon, Manitoba, where he said there were only three occupations – policeman, and he was too short to be one; crook, and he was too nice to try that; and carnie. He hitched a job on Royal American Shows working the sideshows and then Myerhoff Shows. And then he met Simba, the lion. "The lion was jealous of me," Jackie said. Simba the Lion loving on a young Bingo Hauser. From Simba, Bingo moved on to an alligator, a boa constrictor and a monkey. They all grew up in the Hauser household, some in the kitchen, some in the living room. Once the monkey escaped and hid in a farmer's truck to make his getaway. Hours later, Bingo had to bail the monkey out of jail. They travelled with the menagerie for years, but then the animals grew too big. The time came to switch from fur to iron. Bingo knew he had to "get rid of anything you have to feed all winter." Jackie didn't want Bingo to get into the carnival business, but he did. Like Tony, Bingo was gregarious and bigger than life. Jackie remembered that when he asked her to marry him, she thought, "You and me and how many others?" But he managed to propose and they bought a Merry-Go-Round and West Coast Amusements was born. There was a carousel horse from that Merry-Go-Round at Bingo's funeral Oct. 16 in Langley, B.C., spruced up and set up by his son Bob. West Coast Amusements now includes more than 100 rides and operates three units. The season begins in April and ends in September. The family has the route covered and is working on details of the 2016 season now. On RCS, Bil Lowry has taken over Tony's responsibilities. Life goes on, but the loss of two giants in the industry is felt by many hundreds of people, evidenced in the tributes paid. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://www.venuesnow.com/two-carnival-legends-lost/

A Bite-Size Square of Canada’s History, Culture and Craving - The New York Times

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

AdvertisementSupported byA Bite-Size Square of Canada's History, Culture and CravingHow the Nanaimo bar, a three-layer no-bake treat from British Columbia, conquered a nation's palate.ImageThe Nanaimo bar is a distinctively Canadian no-bake treat named for a city on Vancouver Island.CreditCreditCon Poulos for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Christine Albano.By Sara BonisteelMarch 22, 2019The Canadian city of Nanaimo, in British Columbia, has been a scrappy outpost of the Hudson's Bay Company, a coal mining center and a timber town. But its place in history may be forever entwined with its culinary namesake, one of the world's sweetest treats.The Nanaimo bar (pronounced nuh-NYE-mo) is a three-layer no-bake square that for the last seven decades or so has been a steadfast source of comfort to Canadians at weddings and funerals, birthdays and bar mitzvahs. Across the country, you'll find the sugary bars for sale at small-town gas stations and supermarkets, where they compete with a class="css-1g7m0tk" href="https://www.presidentschoice.ca/en_CA/products/productlisting/pc-nanaimo-bar-baking-mix.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/22/dining/nanaimo-bars.html

Becoming a seafarers' chaplain was not exactly his retirement plan - CatholicPhilly.com

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Deacon Dileep Athaide, a chaplain from the Archdiocese of Vancouver, British Columbia, who ministers to seafarers aboard cargo ships, poses March 15, 2019. (CNS photo/Agnieszka Ruck, The B.C. Catholic) By Agnieszka Ruck • Catholic News Service • Posted March 27, 2019 DELTA, British Columbia (CNS) — A few years ago, Deacon Dileep Athaide could never have guessed he’d become a frequent visitor on the immense coal and container ships dotting the horizon in Delta and Vancouver. Yet nearly every day, he finds himself donning a hard hat, reflective vest and steel-toed boots, chatting with security guards who recognize his white collar and climbing high ladders into cargo ships as a chaplain to seafarers. “It’s only three years that I’ve been doing this, but it feels like 10 years — in a good way,” Deacon Athaide, 69, told The B.C. Catholic, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Vancouver, while on board a Japanese coal carrier at Westshore Terminals in Delta. The two dozen crew members on this ship are from the...
http://catholicphilly.com/2019/03/news/world-news/becoming-a-seafarers-chaplain-was-not-exactly-his-retirement-plan/