Kamloops BC Funeral Homes

Kamloops BC funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Kamloops funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Holy Trinity Ukrainian Catholic Church

109 Tranquille Road
Kamloops, BC V2B 3E8
(250) 374-1454

Kamloops Alliance Church

233 Fortune Drive
Kamloops, BC V2B 2H7
(866) 420-7758

Kamloops Funeral Home

285 Fortune Dr
Kamloops, BC V2B 2H7
(250) 554-2577

Masonic Hall

351 Nicola Street
Kamloops, BC V2C 5X6

Schoening Funeral Service

513 Seymour Street
Kamloops, BC V2C 2G8
(250) 374-1454

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

2165 Parkcrest Ave
Kamloops, BC V2B 3J1
(250) 376-2515

Kamloops BC Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Audrey Ann 'Penny' Cline - The Altamont Enterprise

Thursday, April 12, 2018

H. Cline of Utica; by their four daughters, Mrs. Wendy J. Hotaling of Northville, Mrs. Laurel A. St. Onge of Northville, Mrs. Erika L. Troxell of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Amy E. Cline of Kamloops, British Columbia; by her two brothers, Paul T. Burnett of Donna, Texas and Clark W. Burnett of Citrus Springs, Florida; and by her 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.A graveside service will be held at a time to be announced in the spring in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Northville. Condolences may be made to the family online at www.northvillefuneralservice.com.Memorial contributions may be made to local hospice agencies.Let's block ads! (Why?)...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

He was the parish priest at St. John’s for 20 years after arriving here in October of 1997. He describes it this way: “Bishop Sabatini was looking around for a priest. I had served in the Diocese of Kamloops for many, many years up to that time. He asked if my superiors would be willing to send me to Lillooet if I was willing to come, so it was mutually agreeable.” Father Bob said there were “no surprises” when he arrived in Lillooet. That’s because he’d been visiting here since 1971. “I came over in the fall of 1971 when they were trying to get people behind the idea of building a rec centre here. They had a dinner here and they were trying to get the support of the people so they brought in a guest speaker,” he recalls. “He was quite a memorable person – Father Athol Murray, from Notre Dame. He’d worked with so many young people and so many of his student graduates went on to the NHL. I was visiting Father Egan, who was the priest here at the time, and he told me I’d picked a good time to visit. ‘You can meet the two Murrays’ – which were Father Athol and “Ma” Murray. I used to meet her over the years and I knew her granddaughter Margie, who lived at Douglas Lake  near Merritt.” Father Bob also frequently attended the annual pilgrimages at Fountain Lake, which began in the mid-1970s.  “So I was coming to Lillooet almost every summer.” Sharing his memories of parishioners, he speaks fondly of individuals such as Sally Almstrom and Germaine Gagnon., “I admired her courage, being an elder and all bent over,” he says of Mrs. Almstrom. “I know the contribution she made and I appreciated her.” He continues, “My life was much more pleasant because Germaine Gagnon existed. She was such a help to the priests in years past, long before I got here and she continued to help to the day she died. People may not appreciate the extent to which she gave of herself. She was a great asset to me and a great blessing to the church. She kept the books for the parish. It’s nice to have complete trust in the person who looks after the finances and it’s nice to have someone who does things to perfection. Every T was crossed and every I was dotted. She had horrendous columns of figures to add and she always did it without an adding machine.” “There’s one other thing I’d like to underscore,” he said, reflecting on his time in the parish. “I’...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Hundreds say goodbye to beloved Vipers owner Duncan Wray - Vernon Morning Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Kurtenbach, a former BCHL ambassador and coach, now lives at Predator Ridge Golf Resort.Ex-Viper captain Chris Crowell, who welcomed a baby boy to his world Thursday morning, made the trip from Kamloops for the church service. His number 18 was also retired by Wray.Under Duncan’s watch, the Vipers claimed four Royal Bank Cup national titles and six Fred Page Cup league championships. He was inducted into the B.C. Hockey Hall of Game in 2011 and his 1999 RBC-winning Vipers team joined the same shrine last year. Wray, a retired oral surgeon, was a key member of the BCHL board of governors.@VernonNewsnewstips@vernonmorningstar.comLike us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Let's block ads! (Why?)...

BC man mistakenly declared dead back among the living - CBC.ca

Thursday, December 14, 2017

A 65-year-old Kamloops, B.C., man has finally had his pension reinstated after a bureaucratic mix-up caused him to be officially declared dead.Bryan Kupiak was brought back to life by Service Canada after his social insurance number was somehow switched with his deceased mother's.He didn't realize anything was wrong until he returned home from burying her in her hometown of Winnipeg."I go home and I open the mailbox and son-of-a-gun, there's a letter there," he said.He said the letter was actually a Canadian federal tax slip that read: "Estate of Bryan Kupiak."'And he says yes, you're deceased'Kupiak said he was confused, so he called Service Canada and spoke to a customer service agent."And he says yes, you're deceased."To make matters worse, Kupiak says the ordeal meant his pension cheques were temporarily cancelled."It's just added stress that I don't need," he said.Kupiak said he gave the Kamloops funeral home both his and his mother's social insurance numbers when she was cr...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/man-declared-dead-pension-social-insurance-mistake-1.4361189

Man killed in car crash on way to visit wife's grave - CTV News

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Thursday’s fatal crash. The young boy suffered minor injuries while Shalloo’s wife broke her shoulder and was badly injured on her face. She’s recovering at the Kamloops Hospital in B.C. A relative, Shahab Khoee, is now taking care of Koorosh, temporarily. “He’s doing okay,” Khoee told CTV Calgary over the phone. “He’s a strong boy. He knows what happened. He knows his dad passed away, the only person he had has passed. He’s a strong person.” Masnadi said she’s been in contact with Ashtiani’s family overseas and said they’re trying to figure out who will care for Koroosh. She said the young boy’s relatives will go through a legal process to determine who will raise him. Shalloo’s family have travelled to B.C. to make arrangements for his funeral.With a report from CTV Calgary’s Inu Sidhu Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/man-killed-in-car-crash-on-way-to-visit-wife-s-grave-1.3454375

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A doctor who spent decades working to improve health care in northern British Columbia is being mourned after he died Tuesday night.Dr. Bert Kelly was a "tireless champion for health care" said Prince George city councillor Susan Scott, who announced his passing via Facebook.Kelly was a key architect of the Northern Medical Program, in which students in UBC's medical program are trained in northern B.C. in an effort to help recruit and retain future medical professionals in a region that historically has been underserved.Faced with chronic doctor shortages in Prince George and the surrounding area, Kelly helped lead a local group of physicians and specialists in what was effectively a strike in 2000, withdrawing non-essential services until the province agreed to commit more funding and efforts to recruitment and retention of doctors in the north. By 2004 the Northern Medical Program was opened, with Kelly serving the role of Executive Director of the Northern Medical Society.Truly sad this morning at the loss of Dr. Bert Kelly! He wa...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506

Audrey Ann 'Penny' Cline - The Altamont Enterprise

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Utica; by their four daughters, Mrs. Wendy J. Hotaling of Northville, Mrs. Laurel A. St. Onge of Northville, Mrs. Erika L. Troxell of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Amy E. Cline of Kamloops, British Columbia; by her two brothers, Paul T. Burnett of Donna, Texas and Clark W. Burnett of Citrus Springs, Florida; and by her 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.A graveside service will be held at a time to be announced in the spring in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Northville. Condolences may be made to the family online at www.northvillefuneralservice.com.Memorial contributions may be made to local hospice agencies.Let's block ads! (Why?)...