Burns Lake BC Funeral Homes

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First Mennonite Church

530 Kerr Rd RR 3
Burns Lake, BC V0J 1E3
(250) 692-3259

Burns Lake BC Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Capital Voices: RCMP commissioner's unforgettable case: 'The murderer sent me a Christmas card' - Ottawa Citizen

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

It was good dope and people were pleased. Everything was fine until Pritchard showed up with one of Myles’s direct dealers and put it all together in his head.“Abe Wall was the direct dealer, from Burns Lake, and Abe’s brother was Bill Wall. And Bill Wall had the misfortune of being social with Pritchard. They would hunt longhorn sheep together, and in fact, if Pritchard was good at anything other than killing people and ripping off drugs, it was hunting.“Bill and Dave were tight, and they went out to visit Abe. Pot came up in conversation and they went out to Myles’s farm to meet Myles, and Dave put it all together.“So one day in 1995, Myles’s brother, who lives on Vancouver Island, died. So Myles had to go to the funeral. Now Myles’s wife, Pirkko Skolos, who was loved by all the people in the community, stayed at home when Myles went off to his brother’s funeral. And when he comes back, his wife is gone. She’s just gone.“There’d been a snowstorm and he sees tracks leading out to the woods where their stash of pot is kept, and tracks coming back to the ATV, and that’s it. So he calls the police.“So Myles gives us the whole story EXCEPT for what was out there. He says ‘I deal pot,’ but he’s not giving up who his sub-dealers were.“I tried to impress upon him, ‘Somebody knew that this pot was here and how it arrived.’ So over the next couple of days he starts to give it up, because he gets the consent of all these people and because I’m persuasive in saying I’m not interested in the pot dealing. So I meet his grower, who had a distinctive way of packaging his dope and putting it in trunks with this meticulous wrapping and bags. There were two trunks at the Skolos farm. One was gone and one was empty, with all the wrapping all thrown around the stash site. But no body and no blood.“So the only path to figure out who did it was through his sub-dealers. And that’s how we get to know Abe Wall. And Abe talked about having been to the farm in the summer with his brother Bill and this crazy guy named Dave.“So I interviewed Dave, an exploratory interview. Meanwhile, my partner interviews this other woman, Kim McCarthy, who we find out is Dave’s girlfriend.“I’m interviewing Dave in what we call a non-custodial interview. I’m being very systematic, because he’s not quite a suspect, but he’s a person of interest. So we start having a little talk, and I realize ‘Oh, I’m into something big here with this guy,’ to the point where I shift gears and I go accusatory, thinking that somehow I’m going to persuade...
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/capital-voices-the-murderer-sent-me-a-christmas-card

The Last Post: The search for the man in the cardboard box - Prince Rupert Northern View

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

The Story of Earl Corliss Earl Danford Corliss was born in Medina, North Dakota in 1909. In 1920, his parents, along with eight children, immigrated to Canada and ended up at Uncha Lake, Burns Lake district. According to the Canada Voters List, Earl registered in 1949 as a carpenter living in Prince Rupert, and in 1972 he registered as a labourer in Burns Lake. Earl’s brother, Clarence Mitchel lived in the Burns Lake area, and his son George still lives there with his wife Rhoda — now the closest living relatives to Earl. The genealogy club gave me a glimmer of hope — George and Rhoda’s contact details. Before I called George and Rhoda, I reached out to the Last Post Fund to find out if they would actually do something for Earl, should we ever find out where he was buried. Yes, they could. But I had to provide his death certificate. As Earl had passed more than 20 years ago, the bureaucratic hurdles were many but incredibly the death certificate came through the mail a week after my request. Earl was 85 years old when he died in Prince Rupert on Feb. 5, 1995. Concrete evidence made Earl seem more real than the memories I was jotting down on a notepad. I sent the certificate to the Last Post Fund and they opened a file on Earl. Then another piece of the puzzle fell into place, they sent his service details — he was indeed a veteran. From March 31, 1943 until Oct. 24, 1944 he was a private in the Canadian Army. Yet, decades later he ended up living on the streets in Prince Rupert. Many people in the community who called in remembered him as a heavy drinker. But how he fell through the cracks remains hazy. The Last Post needed to know where Earl was buried to arrange his military grave marker. It was time to call his closest relatives in Burns Lake. Earl’s family/st...
http://www.thenorthernview.com/news/402505935.html

Gentle and generous: Mourners remember BC mother and son killed in police standoff - CBC.ca

Friday, August 12, 2016

Two simple wooden coffins arrived at the funeral in a red pick up truck flying an American flag. A prominent union leader and local First Nations men carried the coffins inside a hillside church in Burns Lake, B.C, where several hundred mourners gathered Tuesday to say goodbye to Shirley and Jovan Williams.  They remembered the mother and son who were killed April 21 in an RCMP standoff as gentle, generous people. Jovan was a former U.S. Marine with a shy smile who loved to draw cartoons. Shirley, a southern belle from Memphis, Tennessee, nicknamed "Boots." embraced northern life after marrying a man from the Cheslatta Carrier First Nation. At the funeral, Harvey Williams described his former partner as his best friend. Minnie Peters, left, and her daughter Kris, right came to pay their last respects at the funeral for Shirley and Jovan Williams in Burns Lake. "I just don't understand why it happened." (Betsy Trumpener/CBC News) "When I heard that they both died, that they were killed by police officers, everything went black," Williams told mourners at Immaculata Catholic Church. "Like I was knocked out by a professional boxer. I didn't want to live anymore." A 'nice family' Sh...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/several-hundred-mourners-at-williams-funeral-1.3565509

Audrey Ann 'Penny' Cline - The Altamont Enterprise

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Utica; by their four daughters, Mrs. Wendy J. Hotaling of Northville, Mrs. Laurel A. St. Onge of Northville, Mrs. Erika L. Troxell of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Amy E. Cline of Kamloops, British Columbia; by her two brothers, Paul T. Burnett of Donna, Texas and Clark W. Burnett of Citrus Springs, Florida; and by her 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.A graveside service will be held at a time to be announced in the spring in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Northville. Condolences may be made to the family online at www.northvillefuneralservice.com.Memorial contributions may be made to local hospice agencies.Let's block ads! (Why?)...

Community mourns doctor who put focus on health care in the north - CBC.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

A doctor who spent decades working to improve health care in northern British Columbia is being mourned after he died Tuesday night.Dr. Bert Kelly was a "tireless champion for health care" said Prince George city councillor Susan Scott, who announced his passing via Facebook.Kelly was a key architect of the Northern Medical Program, in which students in UBC's medical program are trained in northern B.C. in an effort to help recruit and retain future medical professionals in a region that historically has been underserved.Faced with chronic doctor shortages in Prince George and the surrounding area, Kelly helped lead a local group of physicians and specialists in what was effectively a strike in 2000, withdrawing non-essential services until the province agreed to commit more funding and efforts to recruitment and retention of doctors in the north. By 2004 the Northern Medical Program was opened, with Kelly serving the role of Executive Director of the Northern Medical Society.Truly sad this morning at the loss of Dr. Bert Kelly! He wa...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/dr-bert-kelly-prince-george-1.4447039

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506