Olds AB Funeral Homes

Olds AB funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Olds funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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First Baptist Church

5005 53 Avenue
Olds, AB T4H 1H6
(403) 556-3219

Mountain View Funeral Chapel

5226 46 Street
Olds, AB T4H 1B8
(403) 556-3223

Olds United Church

4810 50 ST
Olds, AB T4H 1E1
(403) 556-3052

West View Funeral Services

5303 - 50 Avenue
Olds, AB T4H 1R5
(403) 556-6576

Olds AB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Soldier killed 67 years ago in Korea to be buried in Dayton - Dayton Daily News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

It’s just a shock, a total surprise,” the 72-year-old West Carrollton resident said in an interview Thursday. “A wonderful surprise … We’re just in awe of all this that is going on.”Jessica M. Reynolds, 39, a great niece, never met her uncle.“It was kind of unbelievable to be honest,” the West Carrollton resident said. “It’s been so long. It’s just been a story in our family what happened to our uncle.”Roy’s brother Richard, nicknamed “Dickie,” served in Korea with Roy and by chance the two met the day before Roy was killed by a sniper’s bullet July 31, 1950 in Chinju, South Korea.With Roy missing in action, Bowman — who was 5-years-old when her brother was killed — never thought they would find out what happened.“We assumed that he was gone,” she said, “that we would never find him.”His mother, Helen pressed the Army for answers until her she was killed in a automobile wreck in December 1951.Richard kept the memory of his brother alive for years, hoping to find out answers. He died in 1991 and was buried in Dayton National Cemetery, Reynolds said.“He was always the one that wanted to know what happened to his brother,” she said.Bowman and her sole surviving brother, Ronald, provided DNA to the Army that led to the identification.RELATED: Dayton event marks 60 years since Korean WarCpl. Hopper led an ammunition detail to the front lines when they were ambushed and came under fire. Hopper stayed behind while his men escaped and survived. He was the only one in his detail that died that day. He was posthumously given the Bronze Star for his actions, according to his obituary.His trip back to his family was uncertain from the start. Originally buried as an un...

Edmonton mourns Humboldt Broncos lost in crash, while rooting for ... - Toronto Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

St. Albert’s Sam-Jaxon Visscher, is still trying to make sense of the tragedy. The goaltender had tended net for the Broncos for almost six months, until he’d been traded to the Olds Grizzleys in January.Like many elite youth players, Visscher has worn a lot of jerseys in his career — he’s played for five teams in two provinces in just the last three years — but he said the Broncos had been the most tight-knit. Social media users are reaching out to the town of Humboldt after a bus carrying the Broncos junior hockey team collided with a semi truck. (The Canadian Press)After the crash, he knew where he needed to be: on Sunday, he jumped in a car with his mom to make the 500 kilometre drive to rejoin his former teammates at the hospital in Saskatoon.“It’s one of the closest [teams] I’ve ever been on,” he said, speaking to StarMetro from the road, adding that team mates had “clicked instantly” over a shared work ethic and love of the game. His January trade had made sense professionally, but personally, it’d been tough. “You look away from hockey for a minute when you get traded, and you think about all these buddies you’re not going to be with anymore, and it sucks and that was disappointing,” he said. Strong bonds are formed on the bus in particular, as teammates while away the countless hours on rural highways required to face off against other high level teams.“Guys will do karaoke and play cards and whatever and you watch movies and you’re talking about school — it’s when you have the heart to hearts,” he said.“I just want people to know, these guys deserved so much, they deserved the world. And to lose them right now is just tragic.”Jaxon Joseph, son of former NHL player Chris Joseph, was killed in the crash.The Edmonton native was “the guy that would gel the team,” lightening up the locker room mood with one-liners, said friend and former Surrey Eagles teammate Jeff Stewart, who played with Joseph on the Eagles during the 2015-2016 season.“He always had a smile on his face when he walked through the doors,” said Stewart, who remembers pre-practice pool tournaments with Joseph at his billet family’s home.Aerial footage shows the site of a bus crash near Tisdale, Saskatchewan, involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team. The crash killed 15 people. (The Canadian Press) Joseph was “never the fastest guy on the ice but he could definitely shoot the puck and he always knew his positioning super well,” Stewart said. The twenty-year-old was such a team player that Stewart credits him with helping him get a hockey scholarship.St. Albert’s Stephen Wack was remembered by friends as a towering 6 foot 5 inch defenceman who was also ...

Edmonton mourns Humboldt Broncos lost in crash, while rooting for those still in hospital - Toronto Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

St. Albert’s Sam-Jaxon Visscher, is still trying to make sense of the tragedy. The goaltender had tended net for the Broncos for almost six months, until he’d been traded to the Olds Grizzleys in January.Like many elite youth players, Visscher has worn a lot of jerseys in his career — he’s played for five teams in two provinces in just the last three years — but he said the Broncos had been the most tight-knit. Social media users are reaching out to the town of Humboldt after a bus carrying the Broncos junior hockey team collided with a semi truck. (The Canadian Press)After the crash, he knew where he needed to be: on Sunday, he jumped in a car with his mom to make the 500 kilometre drive to rejoin his former teammates at the hospital in Saskatoon.“It’s one of the closest [teams] I’ve ever been on,” he said, speaking to StarMetro from the road, adding that team mates had “clicked instantly” over a shared work ethic and love of the game. His January trade had made sense professionally, but personally, it’d been tough. “You look away from hockey for a minute when you get traded, and you think about all these buddies you’re not going to be with anymore, and it sucks and that was disappointing,” he said. Strong bonds are formed on the bus in particular, as teammates while away the countless hours on rural highways required to face off against other high level teams.“Guys will do karaoke and play cards and whatever and you watch movies and you’re talking about school — it’s when you have the heart to hearts,” he said.“I just want people to know, these guys deserved so much, they deserved the world. And to lose them right now is just tragic.”Jaxon Joseph, son of former NHL player Chris Joseph, was killed in the crash.The Edmonton native was “the guy that would gel the team,” lightening up the locker room mood with one-liners, said friend and former Surrey Eagles teammate Jeff Stewart, who played with Joseph on the Eagles during the 2015-2016 season.“He always had a smile on his face when he walked through the doors,” said Stewart, who remembers pre-practice pool tournaments with Joseph at his billet family’s home.Aerial footage shows the site of a bus crash near Tisdale, Saskatchewan, involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team. The crash killed 15 people. (The Canadian Press) Joseph was “never the fastest guy on the ice but he could definitely shoot the puck and he always knew his positioning super well,” Stewart said. The twenty-year-old was such a team player that Stewart credits him with helping him get a hockey scholarship.St. Albert’s Stephen Wack was remembered by friends as a towering 6 foot 5 inch defenceman who was also ...

CP Explains: How bodies are identified by the authorities - Salmon Arm Observer

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Related: Body in Humboldt Broncos bus crash misidentified: justice ministryHere’s a look at how the identification process generally unfolds when someone is found dead:How identification happens in straightforward cases:The mainstay of the identification effort for most medical examiners and coroners in Canada is the visual identification. For example, someone is found dead in an apartment. The superintendent or a relative who found the person or otherwise knows the person then positively identifies the deceased. If what they say checks out with other identifying information — a passport or driver’s licence — that’s probably going to be sufficient.“When you’re thinking about visual identification, that is often in circumstances where there are a number of other pieces of information that suggest that’s who the person is,” said Dr. Dirk Huyer, chief coroner in Ontario.What if a body is decomposed or badly disfigured?While fingerprints, X-rays, and characteristic tattoos or other markings on a body may help in the identification process, coroners will usually reach for dental records. That means taking the body to the local morgue, having a forensic dentist examine the teeth of the dead person, then comparing them with the person’s dental records.“That’s often the easiest and q...

Lucas Yardley - Vernon Morning Star - Vernon Morning Star

Thursday, April 12, 2018

It is with the deepest sadness that we announce the passing of Lucas Yardley, a loving son, brother, boyfriend and friend. Lucas passed away in his home in Coldstream, BC at the tender age of 24.Lucas is survived by and will be greatly missed by his father, Rick Yardley; beloved girlfriend, Julie Cleland; mother, Shauna Yardley; sister, Lynn Thomas; brothers, Curt and Shane; grandmother, Joan McKean; Aunt Deeds; Uncle Barry; and cousins.A Celebration of Life Service will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday, December 16, 2017 at Pleasant Valley Funeral Home with a reception to follow in the tea room.Arrangements have been entrusted to PLEASANT VALLEY DIGNITY FUNERAL HOME, 4303 P.V. Road, Vernon, B.C. V1T 4M4  Phone: (250) 542-4333. Condolences may be offered at pleasantvalleyfh.com Pleasant Valley Dignity Funeral HomeLet's block ads! (Why?)...

Calgary murder victim Nadia El-Dib laid to rest on Easter Sunday - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

RCMP officer was injured after a shootout west of Edmonton near Evansburg, Alta. on Thursday night.WATCH: Mason Davis captured this audio from a police scanner during the tense moments when an Alberta RCMP officer was shot and a murder suspect killed west of Edmonton near Evansburg.It started when RCMP said an officer spotted a man who was believed to be wanted on a Canada-wide warrant, and a chase began after he failed to stop his vehicle.In the confrontation that followed, police say the suspect was killed and the RCMP officer suffered minor injuries. Sgt. Brian Topham, 59, was airlifted to hospital in Edmonton after a bullet grazed his head. He was released on Sunday.READ MORE: Evansburg RCMP officer recovering after shootout with murder suspect west of EdmontonLet's block ads! (Why?)...

Conservation group says Alberta grizzly, Bear 148, shot dead in BC - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

PM EDT EDMONTON -- Conservationists are mourning the death of a female grizzly bear that had been moved from a popular area west of Calgary this summer to a remote park in northwest Alberta. Stephen Legault of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative said Bear 148 was shot by a hunter on Sunday after wandering into British Columbia from its new home. Legault said the bear was just becoming old enough to have cubs. "What is really sad is that we have lost the potential that this grizzly bear represented for the further recovery of the threatened species in Alberta," he said Wednesday. He noted that grizzly bears are often killed after being struck on highways and by trains. "The fact that this bear was killed by a hunter illustrates the fact that there are many threats to these animals." The B.C. government plans to ban the killing of grizzly bears for trophy, but not until after this hunting season. Parks Canada and the Alberta government later confirmed the death of Bear 148. "This outcome underlines the need for more collaboration across jurisdictions to co-ordinate wildlife and people management at a landscape level," Parks Canada said in an email. Bear 148 was moved in July from its range near Banff and Canmore, Alta., to Kakwa Wildland Park. The bear never hurt anyone but had gotten too close to people dozens of times since it was born in the Banff National Park a...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

I said to the seniors, ‘If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506