Hinton AB Funeral Homes

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Mountain Rose Funeral Home

210 Kelley Road
Hinton, AB T7V 1H2
(780) 865-8899

Our Lady of the Foothills Catholic Church

124 Tamarack Ave
Hinton, AB T7V 1C8
(780) 865-8899

Hinton AB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Avie Bennett, developer turned publishing giant, dies at 89 - The Globe and Mail

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

O. Mitchell, Jack Hodgins, Guy Vanderhaeghe. Other celebrated Canadian novelists edited by the late Ellen Seligman and published during the Bennett years included Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, Rohinton Mistry and Jane Urquhart.“Among the poets enthusiastically published in Avie’s time were Leonard Cohen and Al Purdy, both of whom were close to him,” Mr. Gibson recalled.The company issued about a hundred titles a year, as well as acting as agent for several foreign presses.Later, in 2013, Mr. Bennett lived out every publisher’s dream: He was thrilled to attend the formal ceremony in Stockholm with Alice Munro’s daughter Jenny, who accepted her mother’s Nobel Prize in Literature. But by then Canadian publishing had changed drastically and his glittering acquisition had slipped from his grasp; he no longer owned McClelland & Stewart.Mr. Bennett died on June 2 in Mount Sinai Hospital of unknown causes. His son Paul Bennett said his father collapsed suddenly the previous day at the Hazelton Place Retirement Residence where he lived for the past 17 months. He had become frail and used a walker. He had moved into the retirement home when his wife Beverly could no longer look after him in their Yorkville condo. Only a few days earlier, father and son – both huge baseball fans – had gone to see the Blue Jays play (they lost 3-1).Avie Bennett was born in Toronto on Jan. 2, 1928, the second of two children of Sophie (née Kleinberg) and Archie Bennett. Archie and his brothers, Dave and Jacob, were home builders, working with their father, Saul; the family had relocated from Kingston, where Saul had operated a lumberyard.The three brothers founded Principal Investments in the 1930s and began to prosper when they turned to building commercial properties in the forties. “My great-uncle Dave was the driving force,” Paul explained.In 1952, taking advantage of the postwar boom, they built Sunnybrook Plaza at Bayview and Eglinton Avenues, the first such shopping plaza in Ontario. By the late fifties, they had built a string of shopping plazas across Canada estimated to be worth $100-million. A story in The Globe and Mail in 1956 called the brothers, by then in their 60s, the country’s biggest commercial landlords, whose tenants included every Canadian bank and retail chain store.Avie Bennett went to the University of Toronto but left without a degree in 1948 to work for the expanding family firm. His college years, however, were not wasted because on the steps of the university library one day he had met a co-ed named Beverly Shapiro who became the love of his life. He was 22 when they married in 1950 and Paul, the first of their six children, was born a year later.“I went everywhere with my father when I was a child,” Paul recalled. “I remember he took me with him in 1954 to show me Dixie Plaza, which was under construction and opening soon.”A plaza opening called for a big celebration with balloons, clowns, snacks, perhaps a band. “I was 3 years old and I said ‘Will you give out Dixie cups?’ And that’s exactly what he did.” (They were filled with ice cream.)Then, in 1962, Principal Investments became overextended and collapsed. When the company went into receivership, the founding brothers took the opportunity to retire, leaving Mr. Bennett to cope with the fallout.“One...

Longtime Bell Media radio VP Greg Hinton dies at 54 - Media In Canada

Friday, February 17, 2017

Longtime Bell Media radio VP Greg Hinton dies at 54The radio industry veteran had cancer for two years before his passing. January 25, 2017 Tweet -- Greg Hinton, a longtime GM and VP of Bell Media Radio for Brockville/Kingston, Ont., has died after a two-year battle with cancer.Hinton died peacefully on Tuesday in his sleep at his home on Howe Island, Ont. at the age of 54. He is survived by his wife, two daughters and a son, according to a release from Bell Media on his death.“Greg has played an integral role in the success of Bell Media’s Kingston and Brockville radio stations over his 30-year career, demonstrating an unrivaled commitment to the radio broadcasting business and his community,” said Dave Daigle, regional VP, Ontario and Atlantic, in the release. “Greg took...
http://mediaincanada.com/2017/01/25/longtime-bell-media-radio-vp-greg-hinton-dies-at-54/

Woman killed in six-vehicle Highway 17 crash identified | Ottawa ... - Ottawa Citizen

Friday, October 28, 2016

The planning committee proved Tuesday it can get a lot done in little time. In less than 40 minutes, the committee said "yes" to more condos for Hintonburg, as well ...An Ottawa man who asked his girlfriend to marry him one winter's night during a skate on a south Ottawa pond wants the small body of water to be officially ...Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/women-killed-in-six-vehicle-highway-crash-identified

Liberal candidates McKenna, Fergus waste no time in launching campaigns - Ottawa Citizen

Friday, October 28, 2016

The planning committee proved Tuesday it can get a lot done in little time. In less than 40 minutes, the committee said "yes" to more condos for Hintonburg, as well ...An Ottawa man who asked his girlfriend to marry him one winter's night during a skate on a south Ottawa pond wants the small body of water to be officially ...Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/liberal-candidates-mckenna-fergus-waste-no-time-in-launching-campaigns

Bicyclist who struck semi near Rantoul dies - Rantoul Press

Friday, August 12, 2016

He struck the rear of a semi-trailer tractor driven by Ricardo D’Andre, 47, of Kingsville, Ontario. Schmidt said D’Andre was filling out his log book. His obituary appears on this website. dhinton@rantoulpress.com Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.rantoulpress.com/news/courts-police-and-fire/2016-05-26/bicyclist-who-struck-semi-near-rantoul-dies.html

Conservation group says Alberta grizzly, Bear 148, shot dead in BC - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

PM EDT EDMONTON -- Conservationists are mourning the death of a female grizzly bear that had been moved from a popular area west of Calgary this summer to a remote park in northwest Alberta. Stephen Legault of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative said Bear 148 was shot by a hunter on Sunday after wandering into British Columbia from its new home. Legault said the bear was just becoming old enough to have cubs. "What is really sad is that we have lost the potential that this grizzly bear represented for the further recovery of the threatened species in Alberta," he said Wednesday. He noted that grizzly bears are often killed after being struck on highways and by trains. "The fact that this bear was killed by a hunter illustrates the fact that there are many threats to these animals." The B.C. government plans to ban the killing of grizzly bears for trophy, but not until after this hunting season. Parks Canada and the Alberta government later confirmed the death of Bear 148. "This outcome underlines the need for more collaboration across jurisdictions to co-ordinate wildlife and people management at a landscape level," Parks Canada said in an email. Bear 148 was moved in July from its range near Banff and Canmore, Alta., to Kakwa Wildland Park. The bear never hurt anyone but had gotten too close to people dozens of times since it was born in the Banff National Park a...

Calgary murder victim Nadia El-Dib laid to rest on Easter Sunday - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

RCMP officer was injured after a shootout west of Edmonton near Evansburg, Alta. on Thursday night.WATCH: Mason Davis captured this audio from a police scanner during the tense moments when an Alberta RCMP officer was shot and a murder suspect killed west of Edmonton near Evansburg.It started when RCMP said an officer spotted a man who was believed to be wanted on a Canada-wide warrant, and a chase began after he failed to stop his vehicle.In the confrontation that followed, police say the suspect was killed and the RCMP officer suffered minor injuries. Sgt. Brian Topham, 59, was airlifted to hospital in Edmonton after a bullet grazed his head. He was released on Sunday.READ MORE: Evansburg RCMP officer recovering after shootout with murder suspect west of EdmontonLet's block ads! (Why?)...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

I said to the seniors, ‘If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506