Glendon AB Funeral Homes

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Northern Lights Funeral Chapel

4304 50 Ave
Glendon, AB T9N 1C4
(780) 826-6083

Glendon AB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Jack Davidchuk

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

French in Winnipeg and Northern Ontario. He spent the rest of his teaching career in Durham Region. After retirement, he continued his lifelong love of learning and earned multiple degrees at Glendon College. Jack had a deep love of the natural world. He was an organic gardener who spent many happy years in his large vegetable garden and enjoyed sharing the abundance of his labours with family and friends. He trod lightly upon this earth. To celebrate the life and mourn his passing, a public visitation will take place on Friday July 28th from 12pm to 1pm with a funeral service to start at 1pm in the chapel at Barnes Memorial Funeral Home.
http://www.barnesmemorialfuneralhome.com/book-of-memories/2992435/Davidchuk-Jack/service-details.php

He was her heroic older brother until she started to dream that he had raped and tortured her - Windsor Star

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Stan Kirschbaum. Agnes and Stan fell in love at Queen’s in the 1970s, when she was an undergrad and he a young professor, and eventually both became professors at York’s francophone Glendon College. She left him in 1997 on the day of her mother’s funeral, moving to Montreal with Daniel Gagnon, an artist and writer whose work she translated, and with whom she had fallen in love. The divorce grew ever uglier, as Agnes contacted media outlets to urge them to report on Stan’s father’s alleged Nazi ties in Czechoslovakia, even once trying to get this issue onto the faculty council agenda at Glendon. (There is some substance to the story, which was extensively covered by the Kingston Whig-Standard years before the divorce.) She was also feuding intensely with her siblings over the family cottage near Buckhorn, Ont., in the Kawartha Lakes. She wanted to keep it, and offered them a lowball price, but they forced her to sell. This coincided exactly with her first experience of recovered memory, in a flashback that prompted her to send a note to her siblings, accusing Bryan of raping her, prostituting her and nearly killing her. Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me “Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me,” she wrote, just before leaving for France. Her daughter Olga wrote to Bryan soon after: “Mom is not well and unfortunately this is not the first of this kind of accusation that she has made.” Accusing had become her “modus vivendi,” her way of life. Bryan replied to Agnes with a note of comfort and concern, saying her behaviour was “strange and worrisome.” The next day, Agnes reported her memories to police. They suggested she keep a diary. In Cassis with Daniel Gagnon a few days later, the floodgates of her memory opened. She felt intense fear and rage, and strange bodily sensations. Words were “popping out” of her mind unbidden, and she would see “fragmented visual images” that felt like “pieces of dreams.” “My memories continue to emerge here in Cassis. The peace of the place lends itself to this process of drawing the painful events in my life out of the forgotten past and into the light,” she wrote in an email to her daughters and nieces, asking if they were also abused, as she suspected. In another, she described swimming in the Mediterranean with Gagnon, when a ray of light broke through the clouds. “I had the impression that I was resurfacing from the depths of the sea, that I was returning to the realm of the living. I don’t know how many times Jessica Nyznik/Postmedia Network Ontario Court of Appeal Peter J. Thompson / National Post Ordered to pay his sister nearly $500,000, Bryan appealed. He hired Marie Henein, the Toronto lawyer who has played her own famous role in revealing the legal perils of frail memory in sexual-abuse complainants, as counsel to Jian Ghomeshi. With co-counsel Matthew Gourlay and Christine Mainville, Henein took apart Agnes’s recollections, and recently convinced the Ontario Court of Appeal to reverse the ruling, grant a defamation claim against Agnes, and make an example of the trial judge for letting a hired expert “usurp his role as trier of fact.” This fall, Agnes was saddled with costs and damages to Bryan of almost $180,000. She has not paid. Instead, she hired lawyers to pursue a Supreme Court appeal. Memories, science suggests, are not like books in a library, or files in a computer, just waiting to be opened anew, exactly as they were stored. Rather, they are stored in many “traces” throughout the brain, and remembering is the process of gathering these traces together, which itself creates new traces. The point is that remembering happens a slightly different way each time. Memories are strung together like necklaces from beads stored loosely in a jar, according to one scientific metaphor. For the courts, the trouble is that these strings can be weak, and when they break, the results are chaotic, ...
http://www.windsorstar.com/news/national/heroic%2Bolder%2Bbrother%2Buntil%2Bstarted%2Bdream%2Bthat%2Braped/12455480/story.html

He was her heroic older brother until she started to dream that he had raped and tortured her - National Post

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Stan Kirschbaum. Agnes and Stan fell in love at Queen’s in the 1970s, when she was an undergrad and he a young professor, and eventually both became professors at York’s francophone Glendon College. She left him in 1997 on the day of her mother’s funeral, moving to Montreal with Daniel Gagnon, an artist and writer whose work she translated, and with whom she had fallen in love. The divorce grew ever uglier, as Agnes contacted media outlets to urge them to report on Stan’s father’s alleged Nazi ties in Czechoslovakia, even once trying to get this issue onto the faculty council agenda at Glendon. (There is some substance to the story, which was extensively covered by the Kingston Whig-Standard years before the divorce.) She was also feuding intensely with her siblings over the family cottage near Buckhorn, Ont., in the Kawartha Lakes. She wanted to keep it, and offered them a lowball price, but they forced her to sell. This coincided exactly with her first experience of recovered memory, in a flashback that prompted her to send a note to her siblings, accusing Bryan of raping her, prostituting her and nearly killing her. Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me “Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me,” she wrote, just before leaving for France. Her daughter Olga wrote to Bryan soon after: “Mom is not well and unfortunately this is not the first of this kind of accusation that she has made.” Accusing had become her “modus vivendi,” her way of life. Bryan replied to Agnes with a note of comfort and concern, saying her behaviour was “strange and worrisome.” The next day, Agnes reported her memories to police. They suggested she keep a diary. In Cassis with Daniel Gagnon a few days later, the floodgates of her memory opened. She felt intense fear and rage, and strange bodily sensations. Words were “popping out” of her mind unbidden, and she would see “fragmented visual images” that felt like “pieces of dreams.” “My memories continue to emerge here in Cassis. The peace of the place lends itself to this process of drawing the painful events in my life out of the forgotten past and into the light,” she wrote in an email to her daughters and nieces, asking if they were also abused, as she suspected. In another, she described swimming in the Mediterranean with Gagnon, when a ray of light broke through the clouds. “I had the impression that I was resurfacing from the depths of the sea, that I was returning to the realm of the living. I don’t know how many times [Bryan] nearly drowned me.” Curiously, her new partner Gagnon had the same experience of recovering memories of child sex abuse by his father, just a few days after Agnes. He later filed a police complaint and legal action that has also estranged him from his family. At trial, more than a decade later in 2012, Bryan’s counsel argued this was evidence of a “shared psychotic disorder,” more artfully known in French as a “folie à deux.” Judge McIsaac decided it was a “simple coincidence.” *** In his 2014 ruling, Judge McIsaac described Agnes’s memories of abuse as a “marathon” lasting 15 years, from age 5 until she was 20 and dating her future husband. “As she stated very poignantly during the course of the examination-in-chief: “On a good day, it was only fellatio; on a bad day he would sodomize me,” he wrote. The details are beyond outrageous. Bryan would force her head into the toilet and threaten to make her drink. He put a gun barrel in her mouth, said her parents never wanted her, that she was a “mista...
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/repressed-memory

Why our ravines are the city below Toronto - Toronto Star

Thursday, August 18, 2016

I’d use them to commute and unwind at the end of the day.“So ravines were like an escape, a place to go to feel connected with nature,” he says, referring to the time he spent in Sunnybrook Park, Glendon Forest, Wilket Creek, Cedervale Ravine, Moore Park and the Don.Ramsay-Brown has explored more than 100 ravines, urban forests and parks in Toronto over the last 15 years.But it was an unexpected question from his young daughter years ago that inspired him to write his book about ravines.A life of peeks at valleysStarting around age 11, Ramsay-Brown was out exploring in ravines on his own.His parents separated before he was born and his mom was busy with her job. They lived near Avenue Rd. and Eglinton Ave., in a quadplex, renting a two-bedroom apartment.“I walked myself to and from school, got a transit pass when I was very young, and had to take myself around to anything I needed to do,” he recalls. “I could walk to Rosedale ravine.”In his teenage years, Moore Park ravine, near Mount Pleasant Rd., north of St. Clair Ave. E., was often called the “party ravine,” where young people went to escape the clutches of their parents. There were a lot of “shenanigans” going on in and around that area, Ramsay-Brown says.But most of his recollections are of a different variety. “For me the memories are largely the isolation and solitude, the ability to s...

Daphne Petten

Friday, August 12, 2016

George, sons Jamie, Cory (Kelli) and their children Jordan and Hayley who were Daphne’s joy. She is survived by her sisters Alama, Mary and Eva, her brothers Cyril (Helen), Vernon, Glendon and special nephew Sterling and their families, sister-in-law Julie Watton and family. She was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by all her brothers and sisters-in-law, special friends Jose, Millie and all her Tops friends, as well as all the children who called her “Nanny Daphne” and other relatives and friends, Cremation has taken place. Visitation in the James J. Hickey Memorial Funeral Home, Kelligrews on Wednesday, August 10 from 10 – 12, 2 – 4 and 7 – 9 pm and Thursday, August 11 from 10 – 12 noon. Funeral service in All Saints Anglican Church, Foxtrap on Thursday, August 11, 2016 at 2 pm. Interment in the Anglican Cemetery, Dunn’s Hill Road, Foxtrap. No flowers by request. Donations may be made to the ALS Society. To sign the guest registry, or to send a message of condolence, please visit www.hickeysfuneralhome.ca...
http://www.hickeysfuneralhome.ca/book-of-memories/2671586/Petten-Daphne/service-details.php

Body found in Mexico probably that of Christine St-Onge, SQ says - Montreal Gazette

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Also in the news:New police chief Sylvain Caron admits ‘I don't speak English very well'Quebec tries to smooth relations with Alberta over ‘dirty energy' backlashSTM bus boss throws union, Nova under the bus 'We're on the right track,' new SPVM chief says of troubled... #ICYMI: Missing Laval woman, Chong on pot legalization, more news Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/body-found-in-mexico-likely-that-of-christine-st-onge-surete-du-quebec-says

Baysville, Ont., woman’s humorous obituary, has readers laughing and crying - Global News

Saturday, March 2, 2019

The 82-year-old spent her last years at the Pines Long-Term Care Home in Bracebridge. Brian, who now resides in Devon, Alberta, got emotional while expressing gratitude for the men and women who looked after his mother.He said ultimately, Sybil would have been tickled by the attention.“The line about her finally having the smoking hot body that she’s always wanted — it’s something that certainly made most people in the comments laugh out loud," he said."One of the comments today was, ‘She definitely made an ash of herself.’"—With files from Shallima MaharajWatch: More noteworthy final notes Woman pens funny obit for grandmother, just as she would have wanted it Let's block ads! (Why?)...
https://globalnews.ca/news/4934262/baysville-woman-funny-obituary/

Albert Frank Czapski - Champaign/Urbana News-Gazette

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Albert L. Czapski (Michele) of Brooklyn Park, Minn., and two grandchildren, Kelly Reid (Dan) of Fridley, Minn., and Kyle Czapski of Brooklyn Park. He was preceded in death by a twin sister, Alberta Dorsey. Albert was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Westville. He was an avid fisherman and enjoyed remote fly-fishing trips to Ontario, Canada, and golfing. He was a graduate of Westville High School, where he played football. He owned and operated Flip's Tavern for 35 years. He worked at Allied Chemical for 35 years and Thirion Glass for five years. He was on the Westville Fire Department and was former president of Westville-Belgium Sanitary District. Private services and entombment were held at Resurrection Cemetery Mausoleum, Danville, with Fr. Robert Hoffmann officiating. Memorials may be made to Westville Public Library. Rortvedt Funeral Services, Tilton, assisted the family. Online condolences at rortvedtfuneralservices.com. Let's block ads! (Why?)...
http://www.news-gazette.com/obituaries/2019-02-04/albert-frank-czapski.html