Glendon AB Funeral Homes

Glendon AB funeral homes in Canadada provide local funeral services. Find more information about funeral homes, mortuaries, cemeteries and funeral chapels by clicking on each listing. Send funeral flowers to any Glendon funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Express your deepest sympathy - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Wonderful way to honor the life and memory of a cherished friend or loved one.

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

All white shimmering blossoms symbolize peace, love, and tranquility.

Northern Lights Funeral Chapel

4304 50 Ave
Glendon, AB T9N 1C4
(780) 826-6083

Glendon AB Obituaries and Funeral Related News

Jack Davidchuk

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

French in Winnipeg and Northern Ontario. He spent the rest of his teaching career in Durham Region. After retirement, he continued his lifelong love of learning and earned multiple degrees at Glendon College. Jack had a deep love of the natural world. He was an organic gardener who spent many happy years in his large vegetable garden and enjoyed sharing the abundance of his labours with family and friends. He trod lightly upon this earth. To celebrate the life and mourn his passing, a public visitation will take place on Friday July 28th from 12pm to 1pm with a funeral service to start at 1pm in the chapel at Barnes Memorial Funeral Home.
http://www.barnesmemorialfuneralhome.com/book-of-memories/2992435/Davidchuk-Jack/service-details.php

He was her heroic older brother until she started to dream that he had raped and tortured her - Windsor Star

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Stan Kirschbaum. Agnes and Stan fell in love at Queen’s in the 1970s, when she was an undergrad and he a young professor, and eventually both became professors at York’s francophone Glendon College. She left him in 1997 on the day of her mother’s funeral, moving to Montreal with Daniel Gagnon, an artist and writer whose work she translated, and with whom she had fallen in love. The divorce grew ever uglier, as Agnes contacted media outlets to urge them to report on Stan’s father’s alleged Nazi ties in Czechoslovakia, even once trying to get this issue onto the faculty council agenda at Glendon. (There is some substance to the story, which was extensively covered by the Kingston Whig-Standard years before the divorce.) She was also feuding intensely with her siblings over the family cottage near Buckhorn, Ont., in the Kawartha Lakes. She wanted to keep it, and offered them a lowball price, but they forced her to sell. This coincided exactly with her first experience of recovered memory, in a flashback that prompted her to send a note to her siblings, accusing Bryan of raping her, prostituting her and nearly killing her. Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me “Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me,” she wrote, just before leaving for France. Her daughter Olga wrote to Bryan soon after: “Mom is not well and unfortunately this is not the first of this kind of accusation that she has made.” Accusing had become her “modus vivendi,” her way of life. Bryan replied to Agnes with a note of comfort and concern, saying her behaviour was “strange and worrisome.” The next day, Agnes reported her memories to police. They suggested she keep a diary. In Cassis with Daniel Gagnon a few days later, the floodgates of her memory opened. She felt intense fear and rage, and strange bodily sensations. Words were “popping out” of her mind unbidden, and she would see “fragmented visual images” that felt like “pieces of dreams.” “My memories continue to emerge here in Cassis. The peace of the place lends itself to this process of drawing the painful events in my life out of the forgotten past and into the light,” she wrote in an email to her daughters and nieces, asking if they were also abused, as she suspected. In another, she described swimming in the Mediterranean with Gagnon, when a ray of light broke through the clouds. “I had the impression that I was resurfacing from the depths of the sea, that I was returning to the realm of the living. I don’t know how many times Jessica Nyznik/Postmedia Network Ontario Court of Appeal Peter J. Thompson / National Post Ordered to pay his sister nearly $500,000, Bryan appealed. He hired Marie Henein, the Toronto lawyer who has played her own famous role in revealing the legal perils of frail memory in sexual-abuse complainants, as counsel to Jian Ghomeshi. With co-counsel Matthew Gourlay and Christine Mainville, Henein took apart Agnes’s recollections, and recently convinced the Ontario Court of Appeal to reverse the ruling, grant a defamation claim against Agnes, and make an example of the trial judge for letting a hired expert “usurp his role as trier of fact.” This fall, Agnes was saddled with costs and damages to Bryan of almost $180,000. She has not paid. Instead, she hired lawyers to pursue a Supreme Court appeal. Memories, science suggests, are not like books in a library, or files in a computer, just waiting to be opened anew, exactly as they were stored. Rather, they are stored in many “traces” throughout the brain, and remembering is the process of gathering these traces together, which itself creates new traces. The point is that remembering happens a slightly different way each time. Memories are strung together like necklaces from beads stored loosely in a jar, according to one scientific metaphor. For the courts, the trouble is that these strings can be weak, and when they break, the results are chaotic, ...
http://www.windsorstar.com/news/national/heroic%2Bolder%2Bbrother%2Buntil%2Bstarted%2Bdream%2Bthat%2Braped/12455480/story.html

He was her heroic older brother until she started to dream that he had raped and tortured her - National Post

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Stan Kirschbaum. Agnes and Stan fell in love at Queen’s in the 1970s, when she was an undergrad and he a young professor, and eventually both became professors at York’s francophone Glendon College. She left him in 1997 on the day of her mother’s funeral, moving to Montreal with Daniel Gagnon, an artist and writer whose work she translated, and with whom she had fallen in love. The divorce grew ever uglier, as Agnes contacted media outlets to urge them to report on Stan’s father’s alleged Nazi ties in Czechoslovakia, even once trying to get this issue onto the faculty council agenda at Glendon. (There is some substance to the story, which was extensively covered by the Kingston Whig-Standard years before the divorce.) She was also feuding intensely with her siblings over the family cottage near Buckhorn, Ont., in the Kawartha Lakes. She wanted to keep it, and offered them a lowball price, but they forced her to sell. This coincided exactly with her first experience of recovered memory, in a flashback that prompted her to send a note to her siblings, accusing Bryan of raping her, prostituting her and nearly killing her. Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me “Bryan, I accuse you by this letter, of the premeditated attempted murder of a little girl I carry inside me,” she wrote, just before leaving for France. Her daughter Olga wrote to Bryan soon after: “Mom is not well and unfortunately this is not the first of this kind of accusation that she has made.” Accusing had become her “modus vivendi,” her way of life. Bryan replied to Agnes with a note of comfort and concern, saying her behaviour was “strange and worrisome.” The next day, Agnes reported her memories to police. They suggested she keep a diary. In Cassis with Daniel Gagnon a few days later, the floodgates of her memory opened. She felt intense fear and rage, and strange bodily sensations. Words were “popping out” of her mind unbidden, and she would see “fragmented visual images” that felt like “pieces of dreams.” “My memories continue to emerge here in Cassis. The peace of the place lends itself to this process of drawing the painful events in my life out of the forgotten past and into the light,” she wrote in an email to her daughters and nieces, asking if they were also abused, as she suspected. In another, she described swimming in the Mediterranean with Gagnon, when a ray of light broke through the clouds. “I had the impression that I was resurfacing from the depths of the sea, that I was returning to the realm of the living. I don’t know how many times [Bryan] nearly drowned me.” Curiously, her new partner Gagnon had the same experience of recovering memories of child sex abuse by his father, just a few days after Agnes. He later filed a police complaint and legal action that has also estranged him from his family. At trial, more than a decade later in 2012, Bryan’s counsel argued this was evidence of a “shared psychotic disorder,” more artfully known in French as a “folie à deux.” Judge McIsaac decided it was a “simple coincidence.” *** In his 2014 ruling, Judge McIsaac described Agnes’s memories of abuse as a “marathon” lasting 15 years, from age 5 until she was 20 and dating her future husband. “As she stated very poignantly during the course of the examination-in-chief: “On a good day, it was only fellatio; on a bad day he would sodomize me,” he wrote. The details are beyond outrageous. Bryan would force her head into the toilet and threaten to make her drink. He put a gun barrel in her mouth, said her parents never wanted her, that she was a “mista...
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/repressed-memory

Why our ravines are the city below Toronto - Toronto Star

Thursday, August 18, 2016

I’d use them to commute and unwind at the end of the day.“So ravines were like an escape, a place to go to feel connected with nature,” he says, referring to the time he spent in Sunnybrook Park, Glendon Forest, Wilket Creek, Cedervale Ravine, Moore Park and the Don.Ramsay-Brown has explored more than 100 ravines, urban forests and parks in Toronto over the last 15 years.But it was an unexpected question from his young daughter years ago that inspired him to write his book about ravines.A life of peeks at valleysStarting around age 11, Ramsay-Brown was out exploring in ravines on his own.His parents separated before he was born and his mom was busy with her job. They lived near Avenue Rd. and Eglinton Ave., in a quadplex, renting a two-bedroom apartment.“I walked myself to and from school, got a transit pass when I was very young, and had to take myself around to anything I needed to do,” he recalls. “I could walk to Rosedale ravine.”In his teenage years, Moore Park ravine, near Mount Pleasant Rd., north of St. Clair Ave. E., was often called the “party ravine,” where young people went to escape the clutches of their parents. There were a lot of “shenanigans” going on in and around that area, Ramsay-Brown says.But most of his recollections are of a different variety. “For me the memories are largely the isolation and solitude, the ability to s...

Daphne Petten

Friday, August 12, 2016

George, sons Jamie, Cory (Kelli) and their children Jordan and Hayley who were Daphne’s joy. She is survived by her sisters Alama, Mary and Eva, her brothers Cyril (Helen), Vernon, Glendon and special nephew Sterling and their families, sister-in-law Julie Watton and family. She was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by all her brothers and sisters-in-law, special friends Jose, Millie and all her Tops friends, as well as all the children who called her “Nanny Daphne” and other relatives and friends, Cremation has taken place. Visitation in the James J. Hickey Memorial Funeral Home, Kelligrews on Wednesday, August 10 from 10 – 12, 2 – 4 and 7 – 9 pm and Thursday, August 11 from 10 – 12 noon. Funeral service in All Saints Anglican Church, Foxtrap on Thursday, August 11, 2016 at 2 pm. Interment in the Anglican Cemetery, Dunn’s Hill Road, Foxtrap. No flowers by request. Donations may be made to the ALS Society. To sign the guest registry, or to send a message of condolence, please visit www.hickeysfuneralhome.ca...
http://www.hickeysfuneralhome.ca/book-of-memories/2671586/Petten-Daphne/service-details.php

Conservation group says Alberta grizzly, Bear 148, shot dead in BC - CTV News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

PM EDT EDMONTON -- Conservationists are mourning the death of a female grizzly bear that had been moved from a popular area west of Calgary this summer to a remote park in northwest Alberta. Stephen Legault of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative said Bear 148 was shot by a hunter on Sunday after wandering into British Columbia from its new home. Legault said the bear was just becoming old enough to have cubs. "What is really sad is that we have lost the potential that this grizzly bear represented for the further recovery of the threatened species in Alberta," he said Wednesday. He noted that grizzly bears are often killed after being struck on highways and by trains. "The fact that this bear was killed by a hunter illustrates the fact that there are many threats to these animals." The B.C. government plans to ban the killing of grizzly bears for trophy, but not until after this hunting season. Parks Canada and the Alberta government later confirmed the death of Bear 148. "This outcome underlines the need for more collaboration across jurisdictions to co-ordinate wildlife and people management at a landscape level," Parks Canada said in an email. Bear 148 was moved in July from its range near Banff and Canmore, Alta., to Kakwa Wildland Park. The bear never hurt anyone but had gotten too close to people dozens of times since it was born in the Banff National Park a...

Calgary murder victim Nadia El-Dib laid to rest on Easter Sunday - Globalnews.ca

Thursday, April 12, 2018

RCMP officer was injured after a shootout west of Edmonton near Evansburg, Alta. on Thursday night.WATCH: Mason Davis captured this audio from a police scanner during the tense moments when an Alberta RCMP officer was shot and a murder suspect killed west of Edmonton near Evansburg.It started when RCMP said an officer spotted a man who was believed to be wanted on a Canada-wide warrant, and a chase began after he failed to stop his vehicle.In the confrontation that followed, police say the suspect was killed and the RCMP officer suffered minor injuries. Sgt. Brian Topham, 59, was airlifted to hospital in Edmonton after a bullet grazed his head. He was released on Sunday.READ MORE: Evansburg RCMP officer recovering after shootout with murder suspect west of EdmontonLet's block ads! (Why?)...

A reflective Father Bob Haggarty looks back on his time in Lillooet - Bridge River Lillooet News

Thursday, April 12, 2018

I said to the seniors, ‘If you can’t get along with the Catholics, you’re free to leave!’” It should be noted the seniors have not gone anywhere. Originally from Alberta, Father Bob was ordained in 1971 as a priest in the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI). The Order was founded in 1816 and has had a presence in British Columbia since 1858. The apostolic Oblates focused on outreach to remote and/or wilderness areas, which B.C. was at the time of the Gold Rush. “The Oblates were there, right at the beginning of the colonization of B.C.,” adds Father Bob, who says those early priests were so young that they were described as altar boys. He can quote the early history of the Oblates in B.C. chapter and verse, but is also fascinated by Canadian military history. He says that’s related to one of his mother’s brothers, who went overseas with the RCAF during the Second World War and was killed in action. “My mother had all these letters and pictures but had no time to organize them. But I thought, ‘If we don’t value his contributions, who’s going to?’ He sacrificed his life for this country, so I felt I owed him that and so I took every photo and every scrap of paper and put them in order.” After he began living here, Father Bob became intrigued by the history of local veterans, particularly the “Boys of Lillooet” whose names are inscribed on the cenotaph on the lawn outside the District Office. “I said to myself, ‘Who are you? Who are you?’” He then spent years researching their lives and eventually produced two volumes (World War One and World War Two) of priceless biographical material - old black and white and sepia photos, precious personal letters written from the front lines, military records and his own conversations with their siblings and other family members - that preserves the memory of the “Boys of Lillooet” for posterity. “Those fellows grew up here, lived within a five or 10-mile radius of downtown Lillooet and they never came back,” he says softly. “I thought they should be remembered and we should be proud of them.” Father Bob believes “history is made up of local people. It’s more than what Prince Charles has done. It’s people who are walking down the street. There’s history there, too.” He continues, “And it’s a good story if you go back and find out what happened. I remember hearing an interview with Mark Forsythe on the CBC and he was coming to Lytton for a public forum on the Gold Rush. It was also about the opening up of the Lillooet area and it was an eye-opener, too. I believe in history and I like to know history. I think the history of Lillooet makes you appreciate the place where you live. And for visitors, so much of B.C.’s history took place within a half mile of here.” He says, “Sometimes I’ll go down to Seton Lake and just sit there and I’ll ask people who are visiting for the day if they know where they are and what happened here. It makes it more interesting for them if they know some of the local history.” Father Bob acknowledges he’s “dealing with the reality of being a senior” and some health challenges involving his eyesight, but hopes to continue living here. “Why would I want to leave Lillooet?” he asks. “The environment here...
http://www.lillooetnews.net/news/local-news/a-reflective-father-bob-haggarty-looks-back-on-his-time-in-lillooet-1.23255506